Do the Beginnings of Spoken Words Have a Special Status in Auditory Word Recognition?

Cynthia M. Connine, Dawn Blasko, Debra Titone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

182 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Six cross-modal priming experiments were conducted that investigated whether representations of spoken words in memory (base word) may be activated by similar-sounding nonwords. The experiments demonstrated that nonwords that differed in one or two linguistic features from a base word resulted in significant priming effects for semantic associates to the base word. Nonwords that deviated by more linguistic features from a base word showed no priming effects. Finally, nonwords in which either the medial or initial portions were altered showed comparable priming effects. This result held for a set of two-syllable words and for a group of longer words (at least three syllables). A model of auditory word recognition is discussed in which partial acoustic-phonetic information in a spoken word is mapped onto a lexical representation in memory based on goodness-of-fit. It is argued that this mapping process affords no particular status to word-initial phonemes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-210
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Memory and Language
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Linguistics
Cross-Priming
Data storage equipment
Phonetics
Speech analysis
Semantics
Acoustics
linguistics
Experiments
experiment
phonetics
acoustics
semantics
Recognition (Psychology)
Base Word
Spoken Word
Nonwords
Auditory Word Recognition
Group
Priming

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Artificial Intelligence

Cite this

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Do the Beginnings of Spoken Words Have a Special Status in Auditory Word Recognition? / Connine, Cynthia M.; Blasko, Dawn; Titone, Debra.

In: Journal of Memory and Language, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.01.1993, p. 193-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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