Does americanization have adverse effects on health? Stress, health habits, and infant health outcomes among Puerto Ricans

Nancy S. Landale, R. S. Oropesa, Daniel Llanes, Bridget K. Gorman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

78 Scopus citations

Abstract

Generational differences in the social circumstances, health habits, and infant health outcomes of Puerto Rican women are examined using recently collected data from the Puerto Rican Maternal and Infant Health Study. The results show that recent migrants to the U.S. mainland experience fewer stressful life events and are less likely to engage in negative health behaviors during pregnancy than U.S.-born Puerto Rican women. Recent migrants also exhibit better infant health outcomes than childhood migrants and U.S.-born women. Risk factors (e.g., low human capital, meager financial resources, and residence in disadvantaged neighborhoods) and protective factors (e.g., strong family support and a Latino cultural orientation) identified in theories of segmented assimilation are related to the outcomes examined but cannot explain the generational differences that are documented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)613-641
Number of pages29
JournalSocial Forces
Volume78
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • History
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does americanization have adverse effects on health? Stress, health habits, and infant health outcomes among Puerto Ricans'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this