Does anatomic versus nonanatomic resection affect recurrence and survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal liver metastasis?

Umut Sarpel, Anthony Bonavia, Alexis Grucela, Sasan Roayaie, Myron E. Schwartz, Daniel M. Labow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anatomic resection of colorectal liver metastases may offer a survival advantage because (1) it removes the hepatic functional unit as a whole and (2) nonanatomic resection has been reported to have a higher incidence of positive margins. A retrospective review was performed of patients undergoing hepatic resection for colorectal liver metastases. 183 patients met inclusion criteria of undergoing either anatomic or nonanatomic resection with the aim of removing all gross disease. Mean age was 61 years (range 31-90 years), 57% were male. 89 patients (49%) underwent nonanatomic resection, the remaining 94 (51%) had anatomic resection. Average duration of inflow occlusion was 10 min. Average length of stay was 7.4 days. There were three deaths, yielding a 1.6% 30-day mortality rate. There was no difference in the incidence of positive margins between types of resection. Recurrence was 27%, 55%, and 59% at 1, 3, and 5 years respectively. Overall survival was 89%, 67%, and 55% at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. Type of resection was not associated with significant differences in recurrence or survival even when adjusted for differences in preoperative risk. We conclude that hepatic resection for colorectal metastases can be performed safely and offers select patients with stage IV disease prolonged survival. Resection type should be based on the number and location of tumors, rather than on segmental anatomy. An emphasis on the preservation of hepatic parenchyma may be of increasing importance in the setting of chemotherapy-associated steatohepatitis, and the growing number of patients undergoing repeated metastasectomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)379-384
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

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Colorectal Surgery
Neoplasm Metastasis
Recurrence
Survival
Liver
Metastasectomy
Incidence
Fatty Liver
Length of Stay
Anatomy
Drug Therapy
Mortality
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Sarpel, Umut ; Bonavia, Anthony ; Grucela, Alexis ; Roayaie, Sasan ; Schwartz, Myron E. ; Labow, Daniel M. / Does anatomic versus nonanatomic resection affect recurrence and survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal liver metastasis?. In: Annals of Surgical Oncology. 2009 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 379-384.
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Does anatomic versus nonanatomic resection affect recurrence and survival in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal liver metastasis? / Sarpel, Umut; Bonavia, Anthony; Grucela, Alexis; Roayaie, Sasan; Schwartz, Myron E.; Labow, Daniel M.

In: Annals of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.02.2009, p. 379-384.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Bonavia, Anthony

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