Does conceptual implicit memory develop? The role of processing demands

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The author investigated the importance of processing considerations within implicit memory in a developmental design. Second-graders (n = 87) and college students (n = 81) completed perceptual (word stem completion) and conceptual (category generation) implicit memory tests after studying target items either nonsemantically (read) or semantically (generated). In support of previous research, the author found no age differences in priming in the nonsemantic study/perceptual test condition. Age differences in priming were found in the semantic study/conceptual test condition, however, where college students had significantly higher priming scores than did children. These developmental dissociations support the theory that the processing requirements of conceptual implicit memory are similar to those in explicit memory. The author also discusses the contribution of the Transfer Appropriate Processing (TAP; H. L. Roediger, D. A. Gallo, & L. Geraci, 2002) framework to understanding these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-36
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Genetic Psychology
Volume168
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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Does conceptual implicit memory develop? The role of processing demands. / Barry, Elaine S.

In: Journal of Genetic Psychology, Vol. 168, No. 1, 01.03.2007, p. 19-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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