Does diversity mean assimilation?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines attitudes toward diversity at an academic institution. Research participants indicated their support for various forms of diversity in response to closed-ended questions and then described what the word 'diversity' meant to them. By comparing numerical data with open-ended definitions, we highlight the particulars of how our respondents interpret diversity. Specifically, we show that for about one-third of our sample, diversity programs are equated with 'oneness', 'equality', and 'color-blindness'. We analyze this interpretation of diversity as a discursive construction that enables respondents to profess progressive views while at the same time upholding traditional American values of assimilation. We end the article with a critique of this emerging diversity regime and consider alternative models of promoting diversity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)631-650
Number of pages20
JournalCritical Sociology
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

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assimilation
program diversity
blindness
equality
regime
interpretation
Values

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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title = "Does diversity mean assimilation?",
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Does diversity mean assimilation? / Marvasti, Amir Barzegar; Marvasti, Karyn McKinney.

In: Critical Sociology, Vol. 37, No. 5, 01.09.2011, p. 631-650.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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