Does doubled singing increase children’s accuracy? A re-examination of previous findings

Bryan Nichols, Julie Lorah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Studies comparing solo singing to doubled singing indicate contrasting findings as to whether children evince superior solo or doubled singing. Previous findings have indicated: (a) superior solo singing; (b) superior doubled singing; or (c) no significant difference. A systematic review of studies meeting the inclusion criteria (N = 6) was undertaken to examine factors leading to these conflicting results. Next, a calculation of effect sizes that were unreported in previous research was based on published ANOVA tables, and expressed using Partial Eta-Squared. In direct comparisons of solo to doubled singing conditions, two studies reported that children sing more accurately in doubled singing; two studies reported more accurate solo singing; and two studies reported no significant difference by performance in the two conditions. The results indicate medium-to-large effect sizes in both directions. Several factors were enumerated to explain the contrasting findings: test administration procedures, song familiarity, vocal models, scoring methods, and teacher/researcher familiarity among the participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPsychology of Music
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Singing
Music
Analysis of Variance
Research Design
Research Personnel
Solo

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Music
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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abstract = "Studies comparing solo singing to doubled singing indicate contrasting findings as to whether children evince superior solo or doubled singing. Previous findings have indicated: (a) superior solo singing; (b) superior doubled singing; or (c) no significant difference. A systematic review of studies meeting the inclusion criteria (N = 6) was undertaken to examine factors leading to these conflicting results. Next, a calculation of effect sizes that were unreported in previous research was based on published ANOVA tables, and expressed using Partial Eta-Squared. In direct comparisons of solo to doubled singing conditions, two studies reported that children sing more accurately in doubled singing; two studies reported more accurate solo singing; and two studies reported no significant difference by performance in the two conditions. The results indicate medium-to-large effect sizes in both directions. Several factors were enumerated to explain the contrasting findings: test administration procedures, song familiarity, vocal models, scoring methods, and teacher/researcher familiarity among the participants.",
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Does doubled singing increase children’s accuracy? A re-examination of previous findings. / Nichols, Bryan; Lorah, Julie.

In: Psychology of Music, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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