Does DSM-IV Asperger's disorder exist?

Susan Mayes, Susan Calhoun, Dana L. Crites

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

141 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

DSM-IV criteria for autistic and Asperger's disorders were applied to 157 children with clinical diagnoses of autism or Asperger's disorder. All children met the DSM-IV criteria for autistic disorder and none met criteria for Asperger's disorder, including those with normal intelligence and absence of early speech delay. The reason for this was that all children had social impairment and restricted and repetitive behavior and interests (required DSM-IV symptoms for both autistic and Asperger's disorders) and all had a DSM-IV communication impairment (which then qualified them for a diagnosis of autistic disorder and not Asperger's disorder). Communication problems exhibited by all children were impaired conversational speech or repetitive, stereotyped, or idiosyncratic speech (or both), which are DSM-IV criteria for autism. These findings are consistent with those of 5 other studies and indicate that a DSM-IV diagnosis of Asperger's disorder is unlikely or impossible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-271
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Fingerprint

Asperger Syndrome
Autistic Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Communication
Language Development Disorders
Intelligence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Does DSM-IV Asperger's disorder exist? / Mayes, Susan; Calhoun, Susan; Crites, Dana L.

In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.01.2001, p. 263-271.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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