Does ketamine affect intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring in children undergoing selective posterior rhizotomy?

Chantal Frigon, Khaled Sedeek, Chantal Poulin, Karen Brown, Jean Pierre Farmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Direct dorsal rootlet stimulation with intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring is an adjunct to clinical evaluation during selective posterior rhizotomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of ketamine on intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring during selective posterior rhizotomy. Specifically, we sought to determine if low dose ketamine given as part of the anesthesia was associated with changes in intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring in patients who underwent selective posterior rhizotomy. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using anesthetic records and electrophysiological records of 32 children who had intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring during selective posterior rhizotomy under general anesthesia. Administration and dosage of ketamine preceding the stimulation of dorsal roots was determined from the anesthetic record. A pediatric neurologist, blinded to patient, and to ketamine exposure, evaluated different electrophysiological criteria. Results: Eight children received ketamine and 24 did not receive it. The mean average dose of ketamine was 0.18 mg·kg-1 (sd: 0.04). We did not find any statistically significant difference in intraoperative electrophysiological response between the ketamine and the control groups. However, we noted some trends: Administration of ketamine preceding the stimulation of dorsal roots was associated with a lower maximal threshold (2.7 mA vs 3.5 mA, P = 0.663) and root thresholds compared with children who did not receive ketamine. In addition, the train response following delivery of the suprastimulation tended to last longer with the presence of ketamine. Conclusions: Administration of low dose ketamine preceding the stimulation of dorsal roots during selective posterior rhizotomy might be associated with lower maximal thresholds and a more sustained train response following stimulation. Physicians should be aware of this finding in order to avoid misinterpreting intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-837
Number of pages7
JournalPaediatric Anaesthesia
Volume18
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

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Rhizotomy
Intraoperative Monitoring
Ketamine
Spinal Nerve Roots
Anesthetics
General Anesthesia
Cohort Studies
Anesthesia
Retrospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Frigon, Chantal ; Sedeek, Khaled ; Poulin, Chantal ; Brown, Karen ; Farmer, Jean Pierre. / Does ketamine affect intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring in children undergoing selective posterior rhizotomy?. In: Paediatric Anaesthesia. 2008 ; Vol. 18, No. 9. pp. 831-837.
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Does ketamine affect intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring in children undergoing selective posterior rhizotomy? / Frigon, Chantal; Sedeek, Khaled; Poulin, Chantal; Brown, Karen; Farmer, Jean Pierre.

In: Paediatric Anaesthesia, Vol. 18, No. 9, 01.09.2008, p. 831-837.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Frigon, Chantal

AU - Sedeek, Khaled

AU - Poulin, Chantal

AU - Brown, Karen

AU - Farmer, Jean Pierre

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N2 - Objective: Direct dorsal rootlet stimulation with intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring is an adjunct to clinical evaluation during selective posterior rhizotomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of ketamine on intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring during selective posterior rhizotomy. Specifically, we sought to determine if low dose ketamine given as part of the anesthesia was associated with changes in intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring in patients who underwent selective posterior rhizotomy. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using anesthetic records and electrophysiological records of 32 children who had intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring during selective posterior rhizotomy under general anesthesia. Administration and dosage of ketamine preceding the stimulation of dorsal roots was determined from the anesthetic record. A pediatric neurologist, blinded to patient, and to ketamine exposure, evaluated different electrophysiological criteria. Results: Eight children received ketamine and 24 did not receive it. The mean average dose of ketamine was 0.18 mg·kg-1 (sd: 0.04). We did not find any statistically significant difference in intraoperative electrophysiological response between the ketamine and the control groups. However, we noted some trends: Administration of ketamine preceding the stimulation of dorsal roots was associated with a lower maximal threshold (2.7 mA vs 3.5 mA, P = 0.663) and root thresholds compared with children who did not receive ketamine. In addition, the train response following delivery of the suprastimulation tended to last longer with the presence of ketamine. Conclusions: Administration of low dose ketamine preceding the stimulation of dorsal roots during selective posterior rhizotomy might be associated with lower maximal thresholds and a more sustained train response following stimulation. Physicians should be aware of this finding in order to avoid misinterpreting intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring.

AB - Objective: Direct dorsal rootlet stimulation with intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring is an adjunct to clinical evaluation during selective posterior rhizotomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of ketamine on intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring during selective posterior rhizotomy. Specifically, we sought to determine if low dose ketamine given as part of the anesthesia was associated with changes in intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring in patients who underwent selective posterior rhizotomy. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using anesthetic records and electrophysiological records of 32 children who had intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring during selective posterior rhizotomy under general anesthesia. Administration and dosage of ketamine preceding the stimulation of dorsal roots was determined from the anesthetic record. A pediatric neurologist, blinded to patient, and to ketamine exposure, evaluated different electrophysiological criteria. Results: Eight children received ketamine and 24 did not receive it. The mean average dose of ketamine was 0.18 mg·kg-1 (sd: 0.04). We did not find any statistically significant difference in intraoperative electrophysiological response between the ketamine and the control groups. However, we noted some trends: Administration of ketamine preceding the stimulation of dorsal roots was associated with a lower maximal threshold (2.7 mA vs 3.5 mA, P = 0.663) and root thresholds compared with children who did not receive ketamine. In addition, the train response following delivery of the suprastimulation tended to last longer with the presence of ketamine. Conclusions: Administration of low dose ketamine preceding the stimulation of dorsal roots during selective posterior rhizotomy might be associated with lower maximal thresholds and a more sustained train response following stimulation. Physicians should be aware of this finding in order to avoid misinterpreting intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring.

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