Does Obesity Impact the Costs of Partial and Radical Nephrectomy?

Karim Bensalah, Jay Raman, Aditya Bagrodia, Andrea Marvin, Yair Lotan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We analyzed the impact of obesity on the costs of partial and radical nephrectomy. Materials and Methods: The charts of 237 patients who underwent open radical nephrectomy (48), laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (67), open partial nephrectomy (61) or laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (61) were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical data were collected, including age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, body mass index, tumor size, complications and length of stay. Cost data comprised total direct costs and subcosts, including anesthesia, laboratory, operating room service, radiology, room and board, pharmacy and surgical supplies. Obese and nonobese patients were compared in each group using the Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Univariate analysis was used to assess predictors of direct costs. Results: Length of stay was longer in obese patients in the open partial nephrectomy group (p = 0.04). There were no differences between obese and nonobese patients in terms of complications and comorbidities. Costs were higher in obese patients in the open partial nephrectomy group ($10,187 vs $6,538, p = 0.02). There were no other differences in cost between obese and nonobese patients in the 3 other surgical groups. On univariate analysis length of stay robustly predicted the cost of each kind of operation (p <0.0001). Obesity status was almost a significant predictor of direct cost in the open partial nephrectomy group (p = 0.056). Conclusions: Body mass index had an impact on costs only in the subset of patients who underwent open partial nephrectomy. Length of stay seems to be the main determinant of costs in renal surgery. Further studies are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1714-1718
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume179
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

Fingerprint

Nephrectomy
Obesity
Costs and Cost Analysis
Length of Stay
Body Mass Index
Operating Rooms
Chi-Square Distribution
Radiology
Comorbidity
Anesthesia
Kidney

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Bensalah, Karim ; Raman, Jay ; Bagrodia, Aditya ; Marvin, Andrea ; Lotan, Yair. / Does Obesity Impact the Costs of Partial and Radical Nephrectomy?. In: Journal of Urology. 2008 ; Vol. 179, No. 5. pp. 1714-1718.
@article{d5038f212eb64f1380d47184cca7e156,
title = "Does Obesity Impact the Costs of Partial and Radical Nephrectomy?",
abstract = "Purpose: We analyzed the impact of obesity on the costs of partial and radical nephrectomy. Materials and Methods: The charts of 237 patients who underwent open radical nephrectomy (48), laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (67), open partial nephrectomy (61) or laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (61) were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical data were collected, including age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, body mass index, tumor size, complications and length of stay. Cost data comprised total direct costs and subcosts, including anesthesia, laboratory, operating room service, radiology, room and board, pharmacy and surgical supplies. Obese and nonobese patients were compared in each group using the Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Univariate analysis was used to assess predictors of direct costs. Results: Length of stay was longer in obese patients in the open partial nephrectomy group (p = 0.04). There were no differences between obese and nonobese patients in terms of complications and comorbidities. Costs were higher in obese patients in the open partial nephrectomy group ($10,187 vs $6,538, p = 0.02). There were no other differences in cost between obese and nonobese patients in the 3 other surgical groups. On univariate analysis length of stay robustly predicted the cost of each kind of operation (p <0.0001). Obesity status was almost a significant predictor of direct cost in the open partial nephrectomy group (p = 0.056). Conclusions: Body mass index had an impact on costs only in the subset of patients who underwent open partial nephrectomy. Length of stay seems to be the main determinant of costs in renal surgery. Further studies are warranted.",
author = "Karim Bensalah and Jay Raman and Aditya Bagrodia and Andrea Marvin and Yair Lotan",
year = "2008",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.juro.2008.01.035",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "179",
pages = "1714--1718",
journal = "Journal of Urology",
issn = "0022-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "5",

}

Bensalah, K, Raman, J, Bagrodia, A, Marvin, A & Lotan, Y 2008, 'Does Obesity Impact the Costs of Partial and Radical Nephrectomy?', Journal of Urology, vol. 179, no. 5, pp. 1714-1718. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2008.01.035

Does Obesity Impact the Costs of Partial and Radical Nephrectomy? / Bensalah, Karim; Raman, Jay; Bagrodia, Aditya; Marvin, Andrea; Lotan, Yair.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 179, No. 5, 01.05.2008, p. 1714-1718.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does Obesity Impact the Costs of Partial and Radical Nephrectomy?

AU - Bensalah, Karim

AU - Raman, Jay

AU - Bagrodia, Aditya

AU - Marvin, Andrea

AU - Lotan, Yair

PY - 2008/5/1

Y1 - 2008/5/1

N2 - Purpose: We analyzed the impact of obesity on the costs of partial and radical nephrectomy. Materials and Methods: The charts of 237 patients who underwent open radical nephrectomy (48), laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (67), open partial nephrectomy (61) or laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (61) were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical data were collected, including age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, body mass index, tumor size, complications and length of stay. Cost data comprised total direct costs and subcosts, including anesthesia, laboratory, operating room service, radiology, room and board, pharmacy and surgical supplies. Obese and nonobese patients were compared in each group using the Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Univariate analysis was used to assess predictors of direct costs. Results: Length of stay was longer in obese patients in the open partial nephrectomy group (p = 0.04). There were no differences between obese and nonobese patients in terms of complications and comorbidities. Costs were higher in obese patients in the open partial nephrectomy group ($10,187 vs $6,538, p = 0.02). There were no other differences in cost between obese and nonobese patients in the 3 other surgical groups. On univariate analysis length of stay robustly predicted the cost of each kind of operation (p <0.0001). Obesity status was almost a significant predictor of direct cost in the open partial nephrectomy group (p = 0.056). Conclusions: Body mass index had an impact on costs only in the subset of patients who underwent open partial nephrectomy. Length of stay seems to be the main determinant of costs in renal surgery. Further studies are warranted.

AB - Purpose: We analyzed the impact of obesity on the costs of partial and radical nephrectomy. Materials and Methods: The charts of 237 patients who underwent open radical nephrectomy (48), laparoscopic radical nephrectomy (67), open partial nephrectomy (61) or laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (61) were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical data were collected, including age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, body mass index, tumor size, complications and length of stay. Cost data comprised total direct costs and subcosts, including anesthesia, laboratory, operating room service, radiology, room and board, pharmacy and surgical supplies. Obese and nonobese patients were compared in each group using the Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Univariate analysis was used to assess predictors of direct costs. Results: Length of stay was longer in obese patients in the open partial nephrectomy group (p = 0.04). There were no differences between obese and nonobese patients in terms of complications and comorbidities. Costs were higher in obese patients in the open partial nephrectomy group ($10,187 vs $6,538, p = 0.02). There were no other differences in cost between obese and nonobese patients in the 3 other surgical groups. On univariate analysis length of stay robustly predicted the cost of each kind of operation (p <0.0001). Obesity status was almost a significant predictor of direct cost in the open partial nephrectomy group (p = 0.056). Conclusions: Body mass index had an impact on costs only in the subset of patients who underwent open partial nephrectomy. Length of stay seems to be the main determinant of costs in renal surgery. Further studies are warranted.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=41749124755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=41749124755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.juro.2008.01.035

DO - 10.1016/j.juro.2008.01.035

M3 - Article

VL - 179

SP - 1714

EP - 1718

JO - Journal of Urology

JF - Journal of Urology

SN - 0022-5347

IS - 5

ER -