Does salicylic acid act as a signal in cotton for induced resistance to Helicoverpa zea?

J. L. Bi, J. B. Murphy, Gary Felton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Our previous study indicated that insect herbivory on cotton induced resistance to the cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa zea). Here we examine the role of salicylic acid as a signal in cotton for the induced resistance. Abundant evidence has accumulated showing that salicylic acid plays a key role in coordinating the expression of systemic acquired resistance against phytopathogens. We report that herbivory results in significant increases in foliar salicylic acid and H2O2, a response frequently observed following pathogenesis. In other well-studied systems (e.g., tobacco), salicylic acid inhibits the enzymatic decomposition of H2O2 by catalase and ascorbate peroxidase, but in cotton, salicylic acid has no effect on these enzymes, in vitro. Furthermore, while herbivory enhances foliar catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities, the application of salicylic acid or methyl salicylate to cotton plants does not affect foliar resistance to H. zea. The possible role of salicylic acid as a signal for reduced resistance is discussed in light of these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1805-1818
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Chemical Ecology
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biochemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Does salicylic acid act as a signal in cotton for induced resistance to Helicoverpa zea?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this