Does School Composition Moderate the Longitudinal Association Between Social Status Insecurity and Aggression Among Latinx Adolescents?

Michelle F. Wright, Sebastian Wachs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in social status insecurity and self-reported relational and overt aggression based on the ethnic context of the schools, and how ethnic context moderates the associations between social status insecurity and self-reported relational and overt aggression. Participants were 405 Latinx adolescents (53% girls; M = 14.51, SD =.58). Adolescents were from one of two schools in which they were either the majority (84% Latinx population; n = 203) or the minority (10% Latinx population; n = 202). They completed questionnaires on social status insecurity and self-reported relational and overt aggression at time 1 (in 7th grade) and self-reported relational and overt aggression at time 2 (1 year later in 8th grade). The findings revealed that minority adolescents reported higher levels of social status insecurity and self-reported relational aggression at time 1 and time 2. The association between social status insecurity and time 2 self-reported relational aggression was more positive for minority adolescents. Majority adolescent status did not influence this association.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-186
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Bullying Prevention
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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