Drinking games, tailgating, and pregaming: Precollege predictors of risky college drinking

Kevin Moser, Matthew R. Pearson, John T.P. Hustad, Brian Borsari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The transition from high school to college is a critical period for developing college drinking habits. Hazardous alcohol consumption increases during this period, as well as participation in drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating. All of these risky drinking practices are associated with higher levels of intoxication as well as an increased risk of alcohol-related problems. Objective: The current study aimed to evaluate pre-college predictors (personality, social norms, and beliefs reflecting the internalization of the college drinking culture [ICDC]) of estimated peak BAC (pBAC) reached during drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating, as well as pBAC and alcohol-related problems during the first 30 days of college. Methods: Participants (n=936) were incoming freshmen at a large university who completed a baseline assessment prior to college matriculation and a follow-up assessment after they had been on campus for 30 days. Results: Using path analysis, ICDC was significantly associated with pBAC reached during the three risky drinking practices. ICDC had an indirect effect on both pBAC and alcohol-related problems via pBAC from drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating. Hopelessness and sensation seeking were significantly related to alcohol use outcomes. Conclusion: Precollege perceptions of the college drinking culture are a stronger predictor of subsequent alcohol use than social norms. Interventions that target these beliefs may reduce peak intoxication and associated harms experienced during the first 30 days of college.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-373
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2014

Fingerprint

Drinking
Alcohols
Alcohol Drinking
Habits
Personality
Alcohol Drinking in College
Social Norms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{1f3f1412b92b48ebb80340aaabc7df80,
title = "Drinking games, tailgating, and pregaming: Precollege predictors of risky college drinking",
abstract = "Background: The transition from high school to college is a critical period for developing college drinking habits. Hazardous alcohol consumption increases during this period, as well as participation in drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating. All of these risky drinking practices are associated with higher levels of intoxication as well as an increased risk of alcohol-related problems. Objective: The current study aimed to evaluate pre-college predictors (personality, social norms, and beliefs reflecting the internalization of the college drinking culture [ICDC]) of estimated peak BAC (pBAC) reached during drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating, as well as pBAC and alcohol-related problems during the first 30 days of college. Methods: Participants (n=936) were incoming freshmen at a large university who completed a baseline assessment prior to college matriculation and a follow-up assessment after they had been on campus for 30 days. Results: Using path analysis, ICDC was significantly associated with pBAC reached during the three risky drinking practices. ICDC had an indirect effect on both pBAC and alcohol-related problems via pBAC from drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating. Hopelessness and sensation seeking were significantly related to alcohol use outcomes. Conclusion: Precollege perceptions of the college drinking culture are a stronger predictor of subsequent alcohol use than social norms. Interventions that target these beliefs may reduce peak intoxication and associated harms experienced during the first 30 days of college.",
author = "Kevin Moser and Pearson, {Matthew R.} and Hustad, {John T.P.} and Brian Borsari",
year = "2014",
month = "8",
day = "27",
doi = "10.3109/00952990.2014.936443",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "367--373",
journal = "American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse",
issn = "0095-2990",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "5",

}

Drinking games, tailgating, and pregaming : Precollege predictors of risky college drinking. / Moser, Kevin; Pearson, Matthew R.; Hustad, John T.P.; Borsari, Brian.

In: American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Vol. 40, No. 5, 27.08.2014, p. 367-373.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Drinking games, tailgating, and pregaming

T2 - Precollege predictors of risky college drinking

AU - Moser, Kevin

AU - Pearson, Matthew R.

AU - Hustad, John T.P.

AU - Borsari, Brian

PY - 2014/8/27

Y1 - 2014/8/27

N2 - Background: The transition from high school to college is a critical period for developing college drinking habits. Hazardous alcohol consumption increases during this period, as well as participation in drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating. All of these risky drinking practices are associated with higher levels of intoxication as well as an increased risk of alcohol-related problems. Objective: The current study aimed to evaluate pre-college predictors (personality, social norms, and beliefs reflecting the internalization of the college drinking culture [ICDC]) of estimated peak BAC (pBAC) reached during drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating, as well as pBAC and alcohol-related problems during the first 30 days of college. Methods: Participants (n=936) were incoming freshmen at a large university who completed a baseline assessment prior to college matriculation and a follow-up assessment after they had been on campus for 30 days. Results: Using path analysis, ICDC was significantly associated with pBAC reached during the three risky drinking practices. ICDC had an indirect effect on both pBAC and alcohol-related problems via pBAC from drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating. Hopelessness and sensation seeking were significantly related to alcohol use outcomes. Conclusion: Precollege perceptions of the college drinking culture are a stronger predictor of subsequent alcohol use than social norms. Interventions that target these beliefs may reduce peak intoxication and associated harms experienced during the first 30 days of college.

AB - Background: The transition from high school to college is a critical period for developing college drinking habits. Hazardous alcohol consumption increases during this period, as well as participation in drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating. All of these risky drinking practices are associated with higher levels of intoxication as well as an increased risk of alcohol-related problems. Objective: The current study aimed to evaluate pre-college predictors (personality, social norms, and beliefs reflecting the internalization of the college drinking culture [ICDC]) of estimated peak BAC (pBAC) reached during drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating, as well as pBAC and alcohol-related problems during the first 30 days of college. Methods: Participants (n=936) were incoming freshmen at a large university who completed a baseline assessment prior to college matriculation and a follow-up assessment after they had been on campus for 30 days. Results: Using path analysis, ICDC was significantly associated with pBAC reached during the three risky drinking practices. ICDC had an indirect effect on both pBAC and alcohol-related problems via pBAC from drinking games, pregaming, and tailgating. Hopelessness and sensation seeking were significantly related to alcohol use outcomes. Conclusion: Precollege perceptions of the college drinking culture are a stronger predictor of subsequent alcohol use than social norms. Interventions that target these beliefs may reduce peak intoxication and associated harms experienced during the first 30 days of college.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84907062360&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84907062360&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/00952990.2014.936443

DO - 10.3109/00952990.2014.936443

M3 - Article

C2 - 25192204

AN - SCOPUS:84907062360

VL - 40

SP - 367

EP - 373

JO - American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse

JF - American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse

SN - 0095-2990

IS - 5

ER -