Drug Use During Pregnancy: Validating the Drug Abuse Screening Test Against Physiological Measures

Emily R. Grekin, Dace S. Svikis, Phebe Lam, Veronica Connors, James Marshall Lebreton, David L. Streiner, Courtney Smith, Steven J. Ondersma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the ability of the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-10) to identify prenatal drug use using hair and urine samples as criterion variables. In addition, this study was the first to use "best practices," such as anonymity, ACASI technology, and a written screener, to facilitate disclosure in this vulnerable population. 300 low-income, post-partum women (90.3% African-American) were recruited from their hospital rooms after giving birth. Participation involved (a) completing a computerized assessment battery that contained the DAST-10 and (b) providing urine and hair samples. Twenty-four percent of the sample had a positive drug screen. The sensitivity of the DAST-10 was only .47. Nineteen percent of the sample had a positive toxicology screen but denied drug use on the DAST-10. Findings suggest that brief drug use screeners may have limited utility for pregnant women and that efforts to facilitate disclosure via reassurance and anonymity are unlikely to be sufficient in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)719-723
Number of pages5
JournalPsychology of Addictive Behaviors
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Substance Abuse Detection
Pregnancy
Disclosure
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Hair
Urine
Aptitude
Vulnerable Populations
Practice Guidelines
African Americans
Toxicology
Pregnant Women
Parturition
Technology
diethylaminosulfur trifluoride
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Grekin, Emily R. ; Svikis, Dace S. ; Lam, Phebe ; Connors, Veronica ; Lebreton, James Marshall ; Streiner, David L. ; Smith, Courtney ; Ondersma, Steven J. / Drug Use During Pregnancy : Validating the Drug Abuse Screening Test Against Physiological Measures. In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. 2010 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 719-723.
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Grekin, ER, Svikis, DS, Lam, P, Connors, V, Lebreton, JM, Streiner, DL, Smith, C & Ondersma, SJ 2010, 'Drug Use During Pregnancy: Validating the Drug Abuse Screening Test Against Physiological Measures', Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 719-723. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0021741

Drug Use During Pregnancy : Validating the Drug Abuse Screening Test Against Physiological Measures. / Grekin, Emily R.; Svikis, Dace S.; Lam, Phebe; Connors, Veronica; Lebreton, James Marshall; Streiner, David L.; Smith, Courtney; Ondersma, Steven J.

In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 24, No. 4, 01.01.2010, p. 719-723.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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