Dynamic characterization of an air bearing spindle as a tool to predict asynchronous error

B. Knapp, D. Oss, D. Arneson, M. Liebers, Eric Russell Marsh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Aerostatic bearings are used in precision metrology and manufacturing because of their low error motions. Currently, the data storage industry demands spindles with nanometer-level asynchronous radial error (defined by the IDEMA T17-91 standard as non-repeatable runout or NRRO). Achieving this level of accuracy requires refinement of the spindle design with feedback from performance measurements. Efforts to achieve reduced asynchronous error motion led to our implementation of a dynamic test regimen using the self-excited power spectrum combined with spindle metrology. This paper demonstrates a method of vibration measurement as a predictor of asynchronous spindle error motion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference Proceedings - 14th International Conference of the European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2014
EditorsR. Leach
Publishereuspen
Pages313-316
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9780956679031
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Event14th International Conference of the European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2014 - Dubrovnik, Croatia
Duration: Jun 2 2014Jun 6 2014

Publication series

NameConference Proceedings - 14th International Conference of the European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2014
Volume1

Other

Other14th International Conference of the European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2014
Country/TerritoryCroatia
CityDubrovnik
Period6/2/146/6/14

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Instrumentation
  • Environmental Engineering

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