Dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy versus optimized community care for borderline personality disorder co-occurring with alcohol use disorders: A 30-month follow-up

Robert J. Gregory, Evan Delucia-Deranja, Jacqueline A. Mogle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patients having co-occurring borderline personality disorder and alcohol use disorders represent a common, but particularly severe and refractory subgroup. An individual, time-limited treatment, dynamic deconstructive psychotherapy (DDP), has been shown to be effective for this subgroup, but long-term outcomes are not known. Participants were recruited from a sample of 30 patients enrolled in a 12-month randomized controlled trial of DDP versus optimized community care (OCC). Outcomes were assessed after an additional 18 months of naturalistic follow-up. DDP participants received an equivalent amount of individual treatment and less group therapy than those receiving OCC, but demonstrated large, sustained treatment effects over a broad range of outcomes and achieved significantly greater improvement in core BPD symptoms, depression, parasuicide, and recreational drug use over the 30-month study. These results suggest that DDP is a cost-effective treatment that can lead to broad and sustained improvement for the dually diagnosed subgroup.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)292-298
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume198
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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