Dynamic interactions of the ULI6 tegument protein with the capsid of herpes simplex virus

David G. Meckes, John W. Wills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The UL16 tegument protein of herpes simplex virus is conserved throughout the herpesvirus family. It has been reported to be capsid associated and may be involved in budding by providing an interaction with the membrane-bound UL11 protein. UL16 has been shown to be present in all the major locations that capsids are found (i.e., the nucleus, cytoplasm, and virions), but whether it is actually capsid associated in each of these has not been reported. Therefore, capsids were purified from each compartment, and it was found that UL16 was present on cytoplasmic but not nuclear capsids. In extracellular virions, the majority of UL16 (87%) was once again not capsid associated, which suggests that the interaction is transient during egress. Because herpes simplex virus (HSV) buds into the acidic compartment of the trans-Golgi network (TGN), the effect of pH on the interaction was examined. The amount of capsid-associated UL16 dramatically increased when extracellular virions were exposed to mildly acidic medium (pH 5.0 to 5.5), and this association was fully reversible. After budding into the TGN, capsid and tegument proteins also encounter an oxidizing environment, which is conducive to disulfide bond formation. UL16 contains 20 cysteines, including five that are conserved within a putative zinc finger. Any free cysteines that are involved in the capsid interaction or release mechanism of UL16 would be expected to be modified by N-ethylmaleimide, and, consistent with this, the amount of capsid-associated UL16 dramatically increased when virions were incubated with this compound. Taken together, these data suggest a transient interaction between UL16 and capsids, possibly modified in the acidic compartment of secretory vesicles and requiring a release mechanism that involves cysteines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13028-13036
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of virology
Volume81
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

Fingerprint

herpes simplex
capsid
Capsid
Capsid Proteins
Simplexvirus
viruses
proteins
Virion
virion
Cysteine
trans-Golgi Network
cysteine
Ethylmaleimide
Herpesviridae
Zinc Fingers
Secretory Vesicles
zinc finger motif
secretory granules
disulfide bonds
Disulfides

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Cite this

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abstract = "The UL16 tegument protein of herpes simplex virus is conserved throughout the herpesvirus family. It has been reported to be capsid associated and may be involved in budding by providing an interaction with the membrane-bound UL11 protein. UL16 has been shown to be present in all the major locations that capsids are found (i.e., the nucleus, cytoplasm, and virions), but whether it is actually capsid associated in each of these has not been reported. Therefore, capsids were purified from each compartment, and it was found that UL16 was present on cytoplasmic but not nuclear capsids. In extracellular virions, the majority of UL16 (87{\%}) was once again not capsid associated, which suggests that the interaction is transient during egress. Because herpes simplex virus (HSV) buds into the acidic compartment of the trans-Golgi network (TGN), the effect of pH on the interaction was examined. The amount of capsid-associated UL16 dramatically increased when extracellular virions were exposed to mildly acidic medium (pH 5.0 to 5.5), and this association was fully reversible. After budding into the TGN, capsid and tegument proteins also encounter an oxidizing environment, which is conducive to disulfide bond formation. UL16 contains 20 cysteines, including five that are conserved within a putative zinc finger. Any free cysteines that are involved in the capsid interaction or release mechanism of UL16 would be expected to be modified by N-ethylmaleimide, and, consistent with this, the amount of capsid-associated UL16 dramatically increased when virions were incubated with this compound. Taken together, these data suggest a transient interaction between UL16 and capsids, possibly modified in the acidic compartment of secretory vesicles and requiring a release mechanism that involves cysteines.",
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Dynamic interactions of the ULI6 tegument protein with the capsid of herpes simplex virus. / Meckes, David G.; Wills, John W.

In: Journal of virology, Vol. 81, No. 23, 01.12.2007, p. 13028-13036.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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