Dynamic microcompartmentation in synthetic cells

M. Scott Long, Clinton D. Jones, Marcus R. Helfrich, Lauren K. Mangeney-Slavin, Christine D. Keating

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

139 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An experimental model for cytoplasmic organization is presented. We demonstrate dynamic control over protein distribution within synthetic cells comprising a lipid bilayer membrane surrounding an aqueous polymer solution. This polymer solution generally exists as two immiscible aqueous phases. Protein partitioning between these phases leads to microcompartmentation, or heterogeneous protein distribution within the "cell" interior. This model cytoplasm can be reversibly converted to a single phase by slight changes in temperature or osmolarity, such that local protein concentrations can be manipulated within the vesicle interior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5920-5925
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume102
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 26 2005

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Artificial Cells
Polymers
Proteins
Lipid Bilayers
Osmolar Concentration
Cytoplasm
Theoretical Models
Temperature
Membranes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Long, M. Scott ; Jones, Clinton D. ; Helfrich, Marcus R. ; Mangeney-Slavin, Lauren K. ; Keating, Christine D. / Dynamic microcompartmentation in synthetic cells. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2005 ; Vol. 102, No. 17. pp. 5920-5925.
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Dynamic microcompartmentation in synthetic cells. / Long, M. Scott; Jones, Clinton D.; Helfrich, Marcus R.; Mangeney-Slavin, Lauren K.; Keating, Christine D.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 102, No. 17, 26.04.2005, p. 5920-5925.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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