Dynamic social networks and physical aggression: The moderating role of gender and social status among peers

Kelly L. Rulison, Scott David Gest, Eric Loken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined three interrelated questions: (1) Who selects physically aggressive friends? (2) Are physically aggressive adolescents influential? and (3) Who is susceptible to influence from these friends? Using stochastic actor-based modeling, we tested our hypotheses using a sample of 480 adolescents (ages 11-13) who were followed across four assessments (fall and spring of 6th and 7th grade). After controlling for other factors that drive network and behavioral dynamics, we found that physically aggressive adolescents were attractive as friends, physically aggressive adolescents and girls were more likely to select physically aggressive friends, and peer-rejected adolescents were less likely to select physically aggressive friends. There was an overall peer influence effect, but gender and social status were not significant moderators of influence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-449
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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Aggression
Social Support
aggression
social status
social network
adolescent
gender
moderator
school grade

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Rulison, Kelly L. ; Gest, Scott David ; Loken, Eric. / Dynamic social networks and physical aggression : The moderating role of gender and social status among peers. In: Journal of Research on Adolescence. 2013 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 437-449.
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Dynamic social networks and physical aggression : The moderating role of gender and social status among peers. / Rulison, Kelly L.; Gest, Scott David; Loken, Eric.

In: Journal of Research on Adolescence, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.09.2013, p. 437-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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