Dynamical and microphysical evolution during mixed-phase cloud glaciation simulated using the bulk adaptive habit prediction model

Kara J. Sulia, Hugh Morrison, Jerry Y. Harrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

A bulk microphysics scheme predicting ice particle habit evolution has been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model. Large-eddy simulations are analyzed to study the effects of ice habit and number concentration on the bulk ice and liquid masses, dynamics, and lifetime of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds. The microphysical and dynamical evolution simulated using the adaptive habit scheme is compared with that assuming spherical particles with a density of bulk ice or a reduced density and with mass-dimensional parameterizations. It is found that the adaptive habit method returns an increased (decreased) ice (liquid) mass as compared to spheres and provides a more accurate simulation as compared to dendrite mass-size relations. Using the adaptive habit method, simulations are then completed to understand the microphysical and dynamical interactions within a single-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during flight 31 of the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign. With cloud-top longwave radiative cooling as a function of liquid mass acting as the primary dynamic driver of turbulent eddies within these clouds, the consumption of liquid at the expense of ice growth and subsequent sedimentation holds a strong control on the cloud lifetime. Ice concentrations ≥4L-1 collapse the liquid layer without any externalmaintaining sources. Layermaintenance is possible at 4L-1 when a constant cloud-top cooling rate or the watermass lost due to sedimentation is supplied. Larger concentrations require a more substantial source of latent or sensible heat for mixed-phase persistence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4158-4180
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Volume71
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

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