Dysarthria predicts poorer performance on cognitive tasks requiring a speeded oral response in an MS population

Megan M. Smith, Peter Andrew Arnett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dysarthria is a common symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). To examine its impact on tests requiring speeded oral responses, 97 MS patients and 27 controls were administered the Controlled Oral Word Association Test, the Visual Elevator (VE), and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT). Regression analyses revealed that dysarthria significantly predicted patient performance on the SDMT and VE. When dysarthria was controlled for, patient status no longer accounted for a significant amount of the variance in predicting VE performance; the contribution of patient status to SDMT variance was also reduced substantially, though still statistically significant. These results suggest that the poor performance of MS patients on some tasks that require oral responses is partially due to dysarthria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)804-812
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume29
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007

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Dysarthria
Multiple Sclerosis
Elevators and Escalators
Population
Word Association Tests
Regression Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

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