Early detection of changes in the North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation: Implications for the design of ocean observation systems

Klaus Keller, Curtis Deutsch, Matthew G. Hall, David F. Bradford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many climate models predict that anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions may cause a threshold response of the North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (MOC). These model predictions are, however, uncertain. Reducing this uncertainty can have an economic value, because it would allow for the design of more efficient risk management strategies. Early information about the MOC sensitivity to anthropogenic forcing (i.e., information that arrives before the system is committed to a threshold response) could be especially valuable. Here the focus is on one particular kind of information: the detection of anthropogenic MOC changes. It is shown that an MOC observation system based on infrequent (decadal scale) hydrographic observations may well fail in the task of early MOC change detection. This is because this system observes too infrequently and the observation errors are too large. More frequent observations and reduced observation errors would result in earlier detection. It is also shown that the economic value of information associated with a confident and early prediction of an MOC threshold response could exceed the costs of typically implemented ocean observation systems by orders of magnitude. One open challenge is to identify a feasible observation system that would enable such a confident and early MOC prediction across the range of possible MOC responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-157
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Climate
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 15 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

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