Early parenting moderates the association between parental depression and neural reactivity to rewards and losses in offspring

Autumn Kujawa, Greg H. Proudfit, Rebecca Laptook, Daniel N. Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children of parents with depression exhibit neural abnormalities in reward processing. Examining contributions of parenting could provide insight into the development of these abnormalities and the etiology of depression. We evaluated whether early parenting moderates the effects of parental depression on a neural measure of reward and loss processing in mid- to late childhood. Parenting was assessed when children were preschoolers. At age 9, children completed an event-related potential assessment, and the feedback negativity (FN) was measured following rewards and losses (N = 344). Maternal authoritative parenting moderated the effect of maternal depression; among offspring of mothers with histories of depression, low authoritative parenting predicted a blunted FN. Observed maternal positive parenting interacted with paternal depression in a comparable manner, indicating that maternal parenting may buffer the effects of paternal depression. Early parenting may be important in shaping the neural systems involved in reward processing among children at high risk for depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-515
Number of pages13
JournalClinical Psychological Science
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

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Parenting
Reward
Depression
Mothers
Evoked Potentials
Buffers
Parents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Kujawa, Autumn ; Proudfit, Greg H. ; Laptook, Rebecca ; Klein, Daniel N. / Early parenting moderates the association between parental depression and neural reactivity to rewards and losses in offspring. In: Clinical Psychological Science. 2015 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 503-515.
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Early parenting moderates the association between parental depression and neural reactivity to rewards and losses in offspring. / Kujawa, Autumn; Proudfit, Greg H.; Laptook, Rebecca; Klein, Daniel N.

In: Clinical Psychological Science, Vol. 3, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 503-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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