Earth's temperature variation with depth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Results of an experiment to determine the Earth's seasonal temperature variation with depth, and time are presented. Temperature sensors were buried underground to measure the Earth's temperature variations and were compared to ambient temperature. The results show the Earth has relatively constant temperature at about 12 feet (30.48 cm) below the ground surface over time compared to that of the ambient which varies from season to season. It also provides the earth temperature variation pattern for the Harrisburg area which was not available before now, this could be used in determining the suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique, or as a heat sink or source for an earth coupled heat pump system. The challenge of performing research in an upper division Technology program is also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
Journal[No source information available]
StatePublished - 1993

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Earth (planet)
Temperature
Climate control
Heat pump systems
Heat sinks
Temperature sensors
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Earth's temperature variation with depth",
abstract = "Results of an experiment to determine the Earth's seasonal temperature variation with depth, and time are presented. Temperature sensors were buried underground to measure the Earth's temperature variations and were compared to ambient temperature. The results show the Earth has relatively constant temperature at about 12 feet (30.48 cm) below the ground surface over time compared to that of the ambient which varies from season to season. It also provides the earth temperature variation pattern for the Harrisburg area which was not available before now, this could be used in determining the suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique, or as a heat sink or source for an earth coupled heat pump system. The challenge of performing research in an upper division Technology program is also discussed.",
author = "Imadojemu, {Harris Eze}",
year = "1993",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--8",
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Earth's temperature variation with depth. / Imadojemu, Harris Eze.

In: [No source information available], 1993, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Results of an experiment to determine the Earth's seasonal temperature variation with depth, and time are presented. Temperature sensors were buried underground to measure the Earth's temperature variations and were compared to ambient temperature. The results show the Earth has relatively constant temperature at about 12 feet (30.48 cm) below the ground surface over time compared to that of the ambient which varies from season to season. It also provides the earth temperature variation pattern for the Harrisburg area which was not available before now, this could be used in determining the suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique, or as a heat sink or source for an earth coupled heat pump system. The challenge of performing research in an upper division Technology program is also discussed.

AB - Results of an experiment to determine the Earth's seasonal temperature variation with depth, and time are presented. Temperature sensors were buried underground to measure the Earth's temperature variations and were compared to ambient temperature. The results show the Earth has relatively constant temperature at about 12 feet (30.48 cm) below the ground surface over time compared to that of the ambient which varies from season to season. It also provides the earth temperature variation pattern for the Harrisburg area which was not available before now, this could be used in determining the suitability of underground construction as a climate control technique, or as a heat sink or source for an earth coupled heat pump system. The challenge of performing research in an upper division Technology program is also discussed.

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