Ecological contingencies in women's calorie regulation psychology: A life history approach

Sarah E. Hill, Christopher D. Rodeheffer, Danielle DelPriore, Max E. Butterfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We used insights from life history theory and the critical fat hypothesis to explore how environmental harshness influences women's food and weight regulation psychology. As predicted by our theoretical model, women who grew up in poorer, more unpredictable environments responded to harshness cues in their adult environments by exhibiting a greater desire for food (Studies 1 and 2) and a diminished concern with calorie restriction and weight loss (Study 3). In sharp contrast, women who grew up in more predictable, wealthier environments responded to these cues by exhibiting a diminished desire for food and increased concern with calorie restriction and weight loss. This research provides novel insights into the role that local environmental factors play in women's food and weight regulation psychology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)888-897
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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contingency
psychology
Psychology
food
regulation
Food
Cues
Weight Loss
Weights and Measures
environmental factors
Theoretical Models
Fats
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Hill, Sarah E. ; Rodeheffer, Christopher D. ; DelPriore, Danielle ; Butterfield, Max E. / Ecological contingencies in women's calorie regulation psychology : A life history approach. In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 49, No. 5. pp. 888-897.
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Ecological contingencies in women's calorie regulation psychology : A life history approach. / Hill, Sarah E.; Rodeheffer, Christopher D.; DelPriore, Danielle; Butterfield, Max E.

In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 49, No. 5, 01.09.2013, p. 888-897.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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