Economic valuation of policies for managing acidity in remote mountain lakes: Examining validity through scope sensitivity testing

Ian J. Bateman, Philip Cooper, Stavros Georgiou, Ståle Navrud, Gregory L. Poe, Richard C. Ready, Pere Riera, Mandy Ryan, Christian A. Vossler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The paper introduces the reader to the contingent valuation method for monetary valuation of individuals' preferences regarding changes to environmental goods. Approaches to the validity testing of results from such studies are discussed. These focus upon whether findings conform with economic-theoretic expectations, in particular regarding whether valuations are sensitive to the size (or 'scope') of environmental change being considered, and whether they are invariant to alterations in study design which are irrelevant from the perspective of economic theory. We apply such tests to a large sample study of schemes to alter the acidity levels of remote mountain lakes. Results suggest that, when presented with environmental changes which respondents are concerned about, their values exhibit scope sensitivity and conform to theoretical expectations, and therefore could be used for formulating policy. However, when presented with changes which respondents feel are trivial, their values fail tests of theoretical consistency and are not scope sensitive, and therefore cannot be used within economic appraisals. Interestingly we find that qualitative focus group analyses are good indicators of whether a given change is likely to be considered trivial or not and therefore whether scope sensitivity tests are likely to be satisfied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)274-291
Number of pages18
JournalAquatic Sciences
Volume67
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

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valuation
economic valuation
acidity
mountains
lakes
mountain
environmental change
lake
economics
economic theory
contingent valuation
testing
focus groups
experimental design
test
policy
sampling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Bateman, I. J., Cooper, P., Georgiou, S., Navrud, S., Poe, G. L., Ready, R. C., ... Vossler, C. A. (2005). Economic valuation of policies for managing acidity in remote mountain lakes: Examining validity through scope sensitivity testing. Aquatic Sciences, 67(3), 274-291. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00027-004-0744-3
Bateman, Ian J. ; Cooper, Philip ; Georgiou, Stavros ; Navrud, Ståle ; Poe, Gregory L. ; Ready, Richard C. ; Riera, Pere ; Ryan, Mandy ; Vossler, Christian A. / Economic valuation of policies for managing acidity in remote mountain lakes : Examining validity through scope sensitivity testing. In: Aquatic Sciences. 2005 ; Vol. 67, No. 3. pp. 274-291.
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Bateman, IJ, Cooper, P, Georgiou, S, Navrud, S, Poe, GL, Ready, RC, Riera, P, Ryan, M & Vossler, CA 2005, 'Economic valuation of policies for managing acidity in remote mountain lakes: Examining validity through scope sensitivity testing', Aquatic Sciences, vol. 67, no. 3, pp. 274-291. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00027-004-0744-3

Economic valuation of policies for managing acidity in remote mountain lakes : Examining validity through scope sensitivity testing. / Bateman, Ian J.; Cooper, Philip; Georgiou, Stavros; Navrud, Ståle; Poe, Gregory L.; Ready, Richard C.; Riera, Pere; Ryan, Mandy; Vossler, Christian A.

In: Aquatic Sciences, Vol. 67, No. 3, 01.09.2005, p. 274-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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