Editorial: Does an Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Pill a Day Keep Failing Grades Away?

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

Numerous studies have found that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) significantly impairs academic functioning. Observed impairments span diverse outcomes, from grade point average (GPA) and standardized test scores to grade retention and dropout. The impact of treating ADHD on academic functioning has received appreciable attention but remains a topic of debate because of the mixed and somewhat underwhelming results to date. The best evidence for effect is the capacity of central nervous system (CNS) stimulants to decrease problematic behaviors in the classroom. 1 However, it is not clear whether improved behavior translates into better academic functioning. In fact, there is evidence that parents might be less likely to follow through on behavioral interventions after medication has been initiated, even when parents report persistent impairment from ADHD. 2

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-397
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume58
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Central Nervous System Stimulants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{b43df9cee8994e23bd33b9b766cd3b59,
title = "Editorial: Does an Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Pill a Day Keep Failing Grades Away?",
abstract = "Numerous studies have found that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) significantly impairs academic functioning. Observed impairments span diverse outcomes, from grade point average (GPA) and standardized test scores to grade retention and dropout. The impact of treating ADHD on academic functioning has received appreciable attention but remains a topic of debate because of the mixed and somewhat underwhelming results to date. The best evidence for effect is the capacity of central nervous system (CNS) stimulants to decrease problematic behaviors in the classroom. 1 However, it is not clear whether improved behavior translates into better academic functioning. In fact, there is evidence that parents might be less likely to follow through on behavioral interventions after medication has been initiated, even when parents report persistent impairment from ADHD. 2",
author = "James Waxmonsky and Raman Baweja",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jaac.2019.01.014",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "395--397",
journal = "Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry",
issn = "0890-8567",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Editorial

T2 - Does an Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Pill a Day Keep Failing Grades Away?

AU - Waxmonsky, James

AU - Baweja, Raman

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Numerous studies have found that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) significantly impairs academic functioning. Observed impairments span diverse outcomes, from grade point average (GPA) and standardized test scores to grade retention and dropout. The impact of treating ADHD on academic functioning has received appreciable attention but remains a topic of debate because of the mixed and somewhat underwhelming results to date. The best evidence for effect is the capacity of central nervous system (CNS) stimulants to decrease problematic behaviors in the classroom. 1 However, it is not clear whether improved behavior translates into better academic functioning. In fact, there is evidence that parents might be less likely to follow through on behavioral interventions after medication has been initiated, even when parents report persistent impairment from ADHD. 2

AB - Numerous studies have found that attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) significantly impairs academic functioning. Observed impairments span diverse outcomes, from grade point average (GPA) and standardized test scores to grade retention and dropout. The impact of treating ADHD on academic functioning has received appreciable attention but remains a topic of debate because of the mixed and somewhat underwhelming results to date. The best evidence for effect is the capacity of central nervous system (CNS) stimulants to decrease problematic behaviors in the classroom. 1 However, it is not clear whether improved behavior translates into better academic functioning. In fact, there is evidence that parents might be less likely to follow through on behavioral interventions after medication has been initiated, even when parents report persistent impairment from ADHD. 2

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063315799&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85063315799&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaac.2019.01.014

DO - 10.1016/j.jaac.2019.01.014

M3 - Editorial

C2 - 30849502

AN - SCOPUS:85063315799

VL - 58

SP - 395

EP - 397

JO - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

JF - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

SN - 0890-8567

IS - 4

ER -