Educating the aerospace engineer of 2016

Narayanan Komerath, Mark David Maughmer

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The U.S. aerospace industry is changing rapidly, from vertically integrated development and manufacturing to "large system integration" as their main business. Driven by global competition, the new capabilities also enable the realization of some grand dreams of humanity. This paper lays out two scenarios and argues that leadership will reach or exceed the optimistic scenario. This scenario is used to gauge implications for engineering education. The needs for depth and breadth must be balanced. Skills in developing business cases, teamwork and cross-disciplinary learning must be addressed. Emphasis must shift from measuring "teaching" to "learning", "applying" and "innovating". Examples of modern "best-practices" are used to lay out some of the essential elements for the new aerospace engineering education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4887-4897
Number of pages11
JournalASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Event2005 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: The Changing Landscape of Engineering and Technology Education in a Global World - Portland, OR, United States
Duration: Jun 12 2005Jun 15 2005

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Engineering education
Engineers
Aerospace engineering
Aerospace industry
Gages
Industry
Teaching

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

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Educating the aerospace engineer of 2016. / Komerath, Narayanan; Maughmer, Mark David.

In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 01.01.2005, p. 4887-4897.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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