Educational opportunities abound: Information gleaned from a survey of Pennsylvania pharmacists reveals insight into their knowledge and attitudes about probiotic therapies

Brittany A. Ritchey, Brandy M. Pingatore, Denise Alexander, Kelly Karpa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients often ask pharmacists ask advice concerning use of dietary supplements. To assess pharmacists attitudes and knowledge concerning use of probiotics for gastrointestinal, vaginal, and immunologic conditions, a questionnaire was distributed to Pennsylvania pharmacists. Two thousand two hundred thirty-eight pharmacists were invited to participate in a survey evaluating pharmacists' attitudes toward probiotics, the frequency with which pharmacists receive inquiries about probiotics from patients, and the frequency with which pharmacists recommend using probiotics for different medical conditions. Two hundred ninety-three pharmacists responded. Most were familiar with the term 'probiotic' and expressed some level of comfort ("somewhat comfortable" to "extremely comfortable") recommending probiotic therapies to select patients, but 8.0% were "not at all comfortable" recommending probiotics for patient use. Pharmacists are more than four times more likely to recommend probiotics to adults than to children. Furthermore, survey responses indicate that pharmacists are more likely to recommend probiotics for antibiotic-associated side effects than any other condition. The majority of pharmacists (91.3%) indicated willingness to learn more about probiotics. These findings show that most pharmacists are familiar and comfortable with the idea of using probiotics as therapeutic agents and are willing to learn more about the potential utility of these biotherapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-32
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Probiotics and Prebiotics
Volume4
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint

Probiotics
Pharmacists
probiotics
therapeutics
Therapeutics
Surveys and Questionnaires
Biological Therapy
Dietary Supplements
dietary supplements
questionnaires
antibiotics
adverse effects
Anti-Bacterial Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Food Animals
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

@article{6977149ebe5740e3bd6c451c1a03f176,
title = "Educational opportunities abound: Information gleaned from a survey of Pennsylvania pharmacists reveals insight into their knowledge and attitudes about probiotic therapies",
abstract = "Patients often ask pharmacists ask advice concerning use of dietary supplements. To assess pharmacists attitudes and knowledge concerning use of probiotics for gastrointestinal, vaginal, and immunologic conditions, a questionnaire was distributed to Pennsylvania pharmacists. Two thousand two hundred thirty-eight pharmacists were invited to participate in a survey evaluating pharmacists' attitudes toward probiotics, the frequency with which pharmacists receive inquiries about probiotics from patients, and the frequency with which pharmacists recommend using probiotics for different medical conditions. Two hundred ninety-three pharmacists responded. Most were familiar with the term 'probiotic' and expressed some level of comfort ({"}somewhat comfortable{"} to {"}extremely comfortable{"}) recommending probiotic therapies to select patients, but 8.0{\%} were {"}not at all comfortable{"} recommending probiotics for patient use. Pharmacists are more than four times more likely to recommend probiotics to adults than to children. Furthermore, survey responses indicate that pharmacists are more likely to recommend probiotics for antibiotic-associated side effects than any other condition. The majority of pharmacists (91.3{\%}) indicated willingness to learn more about probiotics. These findings show that most pharmacists are familiar and comfortable with the idea of using probiotics as therapeutic agents and are willing to learn more about the potential utility of these biotherapies.",
author = "Ritchey, {Brittany A.} and Pingatore, {Brandy M.} and Denise Alexander and Kelly Karpa",
year = "2009",
month = "2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "23--32",
journal = "International Journal of Probiotics and Prebiotics",
issn = "1555-1431",
publisher = "New Century Health Publishers",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Educational opportunities abound

T2 - Information gleaned from a survey of Pennsylvania pharmacists reveals insight into their knowledge and attitudes about probiotic therapies

AU - Ritchey, Brittany A.

AU - Pingatore, Brandy M.

AU - Alexander, Denise

AU - Karpa, Kelly

PY - 2009/2

Y1 - 2009/2

N2 - Patients often ask pharmacists ask advice concerning use of dietary supplements. To assess pharmacists attitudes and knowledge concerning use of probiotics for gastrointestinal, vaginal, and immunologic conditions, a questionnaire was distributed to Pennsylvania pharmacists. Two thousand two hundred thirty-eight pharmacists were invited to participate in a survey evaluating pharmacists' attitudes toward probiotics, the frequency with which pharmacists receive inquiries about probiotics from patients, and the frequency with which pharmacists recommend using probiotics for different medical conditions. Two hundred ninety-three pharmacists responded. Most were familiar with the term 'probiotic' and expressed some level of comfort ("somewhat comfortable" to "extremely comfortable") recommending probiotic therapies to select patients, but 8.0% were "not at all comfortable" recommending probiotics for patient use. Pharmacists are more than four times more likely to recommend probiotics to adults than to children. Furthermore, survey responses indicate that pharmacists are more likely to recommend probiotics for antibiotic-associated side effects than any other condition. The majority of pharmacists (91.3%) indicated willingness to learn more about probiotics. These findings show that most pharmacists are familiar and comfortable with the idea of using probiotics as therapeutic agents and are willing to learn more about the potential utility of these biotherapies.

AB - Patients often ask pharmacists ask advice concerning use of dietary supplements. To assess pharmacists attitudes and knowledge concerning use of probiotics for gastrointestinal, vaginal, and immunologic conditions, a questionnaire was distributed to Pennsylvania pharmacists. Two thousand two hundred thirty-eight pharmacists were invited to participate in a survey evaluating pharmacists' attitudes toward probiotics, the frequency with which pharmacists receive inquiries about probiotics from patients, and the frequency with which pharmacists recommend using probiotics for different medical conditions. Two hundred ninety-three pharmacists responded. Most were familiar with the term 'probiotic' and expressed some level of comfort ("somewhat comfortable" to "extremely comfortable") recommending probiotic therapies to select patients, but 8.0% were "not at all comfortable" recommending probiotics for patient use. Pharmacists are more than four times more likely to recommend probiotics to adults than to children. Furthermore, survey responses indicate that pharmacists are more likely to recommend probiotics for antibiotic-associated side effects than any other condition. The majority of pharmacists (91.3%) indicated willingness to learn more about probiotics. These findings show that most pharmacists are familiar and comfortable with the idea of using probiotics as therapeutic agents and are willing to learn more about the potential utility of these biotherapies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=62549165893&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=62549165893&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:62549165893

VL - 4

SP - 23

EP - 32

JO - International Journal of Probiotics and Prebiotics

JF - International Journal of Probiotics and Prebiotics

SN - 1555-1431

IS - 1

ER -