Effect of a prior exposure to a low pathogenic avian influenza virus in the outcome of a heterosubtypic low pathogenic avian influenza infection in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

Taiana P. Costa, Justin David Brown, Elizabeth W. Howerth, David E. Stallknecht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Wild birds, particularly Anseriformes and Charadriiformes, are considered the natural reservoir of low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses. The high prevalence and subtype diversity of avian influenza viruses at premigrational staging areas provide the perfect opportunity for multiple exposures to different LPAI virus subtypes. Natural consecutive and concurrent infections of sentinel ducks with different LPAI virus subtypes have been reported. The protective immune response from different LPAI virus infections is not understood nor is the effect of such repeated exposures. This study experimentally evaluated the effect of a prior exposure to a LPAI virus on the outcome of a heterosubtypic LPAI virus infection in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). The results of this investigation suggest that recent prior exposure to a LPAI virus may affect the outcome of a subsequent heterosubtypic LPAI infection in mallards by reducing the duration of cloacal and oropharyngeal viral shedding as well as the viral load excreted via the cloaca. Wild mallards are likely exposed to multiple subtypes of LPAI virus during the periods of peak viral circulation, and the results of this study suggest that the duration of viral shedding in subsequent exposures might be reduced.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1286-1291
Number of pages6
JournalAvian diseases
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Animals
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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