Effect of applied electricity on springback during bending and flattening of 304/316 stainless steel, titanium AMS-T-9046 and magnesium AZ31B

Jacklyn Niebauer, Tyler Grimm, Derek Shaffer, Ian Sweeney, Ihab Ragai, John Timothy Roth

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the major issues with forming sheet metal is the tendency for parts to spring back towards their original shape when the applied loading is released. Springback is a form of geometric inaccuracy and is the result of residual stresses, which are created as the part deforms. As a result, forming intricate parts require specialized equipment and calculations to compensate for springback. Transportation industries that rely on forming high strength parts currently use complicated machinery that takes up time and energy to meet specifications. This research investigates the effects of electrically assisted manufacturing (EAM), a process in which electrical current is applied while a material is being manufactured, on springback. Bending and flattening testing will be performed on 4 metals: stainless steel 304 and 316, ASM-T-9046 titanium, and AZ31B magnesium. Additional testing will be performed on stainless steel, observing the effect of changing thicknesses, pulse durations, and current densities on springback. It was observed that an increase in pulse durations results in decreased springback for all the materials. Applying electricity to decrease springback was more effective for bending than flattening procedures in stainless steel and titanium, though it was equally effective for magnesium. For the additional testing on stainless steel, a change in thickness affected results when comparing it to current density, but not when observing similar applied current.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProcessing
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers
Volume1
ISBN (Electronic)9780791849897
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
EventASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016 - Blacksburg, United States
Duration: Jun 27 2016Jul 1 2016

Other

OtherASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016
CountryUnited States
CityBlacksburg
Period6/27/167/1/16

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Magnesium
Stainless steel
Electricity
Titanium
Testing
Current density
Sheet metal
Machinery
Residual stresses
Specifications
Metals
Industry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Niebauer, Jacklyn ; Grimm, Tyler ; Shaffer, Derek ; Sweeney, Ian ; Ragai, Ihab ; Roth, John Timothy. / Effect of applied electricity on springback during bending and flattening of 304/316 stainless steel, titanium AMS-T-9046 and magnesium AZ31B. Processing. Vol. 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2016.
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Niebauer, J, Grimm, T, Shaffer, D, Sweeney, I, Ragai, I & Roth, JT 2016, Effect of applied electricity on springback during bending and flattening of 304/316 stainless steel, titanium AMS-T-9046 and magnesium AZ31B. in Processing. vol. 1, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, ASME 2016 11th International Manufacturing Science and Engineering Conference, MSEC 2016, Blacksburg, United States, 6/27/16. https://doi.org/10.1115/MSEC20168810

Effect of applied electricity on springback during bending and flattening of 304/316 stainless steel, titanium AMS-T-9046 and magnesium AZ31B. / Niebauer, Jacklyn; Grimm, Tyler; Shaffer, Derek; Sweeney, Ian; Ragai, Ihab; Roth, John Timothy.

Processing. Vol. 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 2016.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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