Effect of declining mental health service use on employees of a large corporation

Robert A. Rosenhcck, Benjamin Druss, Marilyn Stolar, Douglas Leslie, William Sledge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines concurrent changes in use of mental and general health services and in annual sick days among 20,814 employees of a large corporation. From 1993 to 1995 mental health service use and costs declined by more than one-third, more than three times as much as the decline in non-mental health service use. However, employees who used mental health services showed a 37 percent increase in use of non-mental health services and significantly increased sick days, whereas other employees showed no such increases. Savings in mental health services were fully offset by increased use of other services and lost workdays.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-203
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999

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Mental Health Services
corporation
health service
mental health
employee
Sick Leave
Health Services
Health Care Costs
Cohort Studies
savings
costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Rosenhcck, Robert A. ; Druss, Benjamin ; Stolar, Marilyn ; Leslie, Douglas ; Sledge, William. / Effect of declining mental health service use on employees of a large corporation. In: Health Affairs. 1999 ; Vol. 18, No. 5. pp. 193-203.
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Effect of declining mental health service use on employees of a large corporation. / Rosenhcck, Robert A.; Druss, Benjamin; Stolar, Marilyn; Leslie, Douglas; Sledge, William.

In: Health Affairs, Vol. 18, No. 5, 01.12.1999, p. 193-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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