Effect of diets containing linoleic acid- or oleic acid-rich oils on ruminal fermentation and nutrient digestibility, and performance and fatty acid composition of adipose and muscle tissues of finishing cattle

A. N. Hristov, L. R. Kennington, M. A. McGuire, C. W. Hunt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two trials were conducted to determine the effect of linoleic acid- or oleic acid-rich safflower oil on ruminai fermentation, nutrient digestion, feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and fatty acid composition of adipose and muscle tissues of beef cattle. In both trials, cattle were fed a finishing diet based on barley grain, wheat silage, and alfalfa hay. Oils were fed at 5% of dietary DM. In a metabolism trial, four ruminally and duodenally cannulated Angus crossbred steers were subjected to linoleic acid-rich oil or oleic acid-rich oil in a crossover design with covariate periods (no oil supplementation). In a finishing trial, 16 individually fed Angus crossbred steers and heifers (eight per diet) received linoleic acid- or oleic acid-rich oils during the last 86 d of a 116-d feeding period. Ruminai pH, ammonia concentration, protozoal counts, major VFA concentrations, acetate-to-propionate ratio, polysaccharide-degrading activities, microbial N flow to the duodenum, and the efficiency of microbial N synthesis in the rumen were not affected (P = 0.18 to 0.96) by type of oil. Type of oil had no effect on total-tract apparent digestion of nutrients (P = 0.46 to 0.98). Ruminal true nutrient digestibilities did not differ between oils (P = 0.15 to 0.99), except that the linoleic acid-rich oil decreased (P = 0.05) NDF digestibility. Dry matter intake, ADG, G:F, and carcass characteristics did not differ (P = 0.11 to 0.84) between the two oils. Overall, the difference in dietary fatty acids provided to the cattle produced few changes in tissue fatty acids. Weight percentages of c9t11 CLA were unaltered by the addition of linoleic acid to the diet compared with oleic acid, probably as a result of low vaccenic acid production in the rumen, as the pathway of biohydrogenation was apparently primarily through the t10 pathway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1312-1321
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume83
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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