Effect of Drying Rate on Aerosol Particle Morphology

Muhammad Bilal Altaf, Miriam Arak Freedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The morphology of aerosol particles impacts their role in the climate system. In the submicron size regime, the morphology of particles that undergo liquid-liquid phase separation is dependent on their size, where for some systems small particles are homogeneous and large particles are phase-separated. We use cryogenic transmission electron microscopy to probe the morphology of model organic aerosol systems. We observe that the transition region (where both homogeneous and phase-separated morphologies are seen) spans 121 nm at the fastest drying rates with a midpoint diameter > 170 nm. By slowing the drying rate over several orders of magnitude, the transition region shifts to smaller diameters (midpoint < 40 nm) and the width narrows to 4 nm. Our results suggest that the size-dependent morphology originates from an underlying finite size effect, rather than solely kinetics, due to the presence of a size dependence even at the slowest drying rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3613-3618
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry Letters
Volume8
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2017

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Aerosols
Particles (particulate matter)
drying
aerosols
Drying
Liquids
Phase separation
Cryogenics
climate
cryogenics
liquid phases
Transmission electron microscopy
transmission electron microscopy
Kinetics
probes
shift
kinetics
liquids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "The morphology of aerosol particles impacts their role in the climate system. In the submicron size regime, the morphology of particles that undergo liquid-liquid phase separation is dependent on their size, where for some systems small particles are homogeneous and large particles are phase-separated. We use cryogenic transmission electron microscopy to probe the morphology of model organic aerosol systems. We observe that the transition region (where both homogeneous and phase-separated morphologies are seen) spans 121 nm at the fastest drying rates with a midpoint diameter > 170 nm. By slowing the drying rate over several orders of magnitude, the transition region shifts to smaller diameters (midpoint < 40 nm) and the width narrows to 4 nm. Our results suggest that the size-dependent morphology originates from an underlying finite size effect, rather than solely kinetics, due to the presence of a size dependence even at the slowest drying rates.",
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Effect of Drying Rate on Aerosol Particle Morphology. / Altaf, Muhammad Bilal; Freedman, Miriam Arak.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, Vol. 8, No. 15, 03.08.2017, p. 3613-3618.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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