Effect of macromolecular crowding on DNA: Au nanoparticle bioconjugate assembly

Glenn P. Goodrich, Marcus R. Helfrich, Jennifer J. Overberg, Christine Dolan Keating

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

DNA:Au nanosphere bioconjugates have applications in biosensing and in the bottom-up assembly of materials. These bioconjugates can be selectively assembled into three-dimensional aggregates upon addition of complementary DNA oligonucleotides and can be dissociated by heating above a melting transition temperature at which the DNA duplexes are denatured. Herein we describe the impact of polymeric solutes on the thermal denaturation behavior of DNA:Au nanoparticle bioconjugate assemblies. Polymeric solutes can dramatically impact biochemical reactions via macromolecular crowding. Poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEGs) and dextrans of varying molecular weights were used as crowding reagents. While both PEG and dextran increased the stability of DNA:Au aggregates, melting transition temperatures in the presence of PEG were impacted more significantly. Polymer molecular weight was less important than polymer chemistry and weight percent in solution. For a high (15%) weight percent of PEG, aggregation was observed even in the absence of complementary oligonucleotides. These results underscore the importance of polymer chemistry in addition to physical volume exclusion in macromolecular crowding and point to the importance of understanding these effects when designing biorecognition-based nanoparticle assembly schemes in complex matrixes (i.e., any involving polymeric solutes).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10246-10251
Number of pages6
JournalLangmuir
Volume20
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 9 2004

Fingerprint

crowding
Polyethylene glycols
DNA
deoxyribonucleic acid
assembly
polymer chemistry
Nanoparticles
nanoparticles
solutes
dextrans
oligonucleotides
Polymers
Dextran
Oligonucleotides
molecular weight
Dextrans
transition temperature
complementary DNA
melting
Superconducting transition temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

Goodrich, Glenn P. ; Helfrich, Marcus R. ; Overberg, Jennifer J. ; Keating, Christine Dolan. / Effect of macromolecular crowding on DNA : Au nanoparticle bioconjugate assembly. In: Langmuir. 2004 ; Vol. 20, No. 23. pp. 10246-10251.
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Effect of macromolecular crowding on DNA : Au nanoparticle bioconjugate assembly. / Goodrich, Glenn P.; Helfrich, Marcus R.; Overberg, Jennifer J.; Keating, Christine Dolan.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 20, No. 23, 09.11.2004, p. 10246-10251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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