Effect of macrophages on the translocation of protein kinase C in concanavalin a‐stimulated lymphocytes

Deborah S. Grove, Andrea M. Mastro

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Abstract

The concanavalin A (Con A)‐induced proliferation of lymph node lymphocytes is dependent on the presence of macrophages. When lymphocytes are depleted of macrophages, Con A is no longer mitogenic. Either 12‐0‐tetradecanoylphorbol‐13‐acetae (TPA), interleukin 1 (IL1), or macrophages in combination with Con A can restore proliferation. To establish where the proliferation process is blocked in the absence of macrophages, an early step in the signalling pathway, the activation of protein kinase C, was examined. It was found that although Con A caused translocation of protein kinase C from the cytosol to the membrane of lymph node cells, when the lymph node cells were depleted of macrophages and exposed to Con A, this translocation of protein kinase C did not occur. Instead, protein kinase C activity decreased in the membrane fraction and increased in the cytosol. On the other hand, TPA caused translocation of protein kinase C (PKC) from the cytosol to the membrane regardless of the presence of macrophages. However, the macrophage product, IL1, alone or in combination with Con A did not cause translocation of protein kinase C. In a reconstitution experiment, in which lymph node cells were depleted of macrophages and then macrophages were added back, the addition of Con A again lead to translocation of protein kinase C from the cytosol to the membrane. This combination also restored cell proliferation. Therefore, the Con A induced PKC translocation in T lymphocytes is macrophage mediated. TPA overcomes the macrophage requirement by directly activaing PKC, while IL1 appears to act at a different step in proliferation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-567
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cellular Physiology
Volume138
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1989

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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