Effect of "missing" information on fast mapping by individuals with vocabulary limitations associated with intellectual disability

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One phenomenon of language development is a dramatic increase in vocabulary size, driven by rapid word learning. For individuals with intellectual disabilities, the size of the lexicon often lags behind what would be expected both for CA and MA. I examined how well individuals with severely limited receptive vocabulary associated with intellectual disability retained a new word-picture map after a single exposure under conditions of varying difficulty. This study was a direct replication of a previous investigation with typically developing preschool children, enabling a direct comparison. Individuals with intellectual disabilities performed equally as well as control children in the initial exposure phase but poorer when asked to remember the initial map in the presence of other novel distracters or labels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal on Mental Retardation
Volume112
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

Fingerprint

Vocabulary
Intellectual Disability
vocabulary
disability
Language Development
Preschool Children
preschool child
Learning
language
learning
Fast Mapping

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Education

Cite this

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