Effect of Multiple Previous Miscarriages on Health Behaviors and Health Care Utilization During Subsequent Pregnancy

Cara Bicking Kinsey, Kesha Baptiste-Roberts, Junjia Zhu, Kristen Kjerulff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Women with a history of miscarriage report feeling emotionally guarded during a subsequent pregnancy and may be at increased risk for pregnancy-related anxiety and greater health care utilization compared with women without a history of miscarriage. However, these behaviors have not been studied in women with a history of multiple miscarriages. Methods: We examined the effect of a history of multiple miscarriages on health behaviors and health care utilization in 2,854 women ages 18 to 36years expecting their first live-born baby. Self-reported health behaviors and use of health care resources during pregnancy were compared for women with a history of two or more miscarriages and women with one or no miscarriages. Findings: Women with a history of multiple miscarriages were more than four times as likely to smoke during pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio [aOR],4.69; 95% CI, 2.63-8.38) compared with women without a history of multiple miscarriages. They initiated prenatal care earlier (7.0 vs. 8.2weeks gestation), had higher odds of third trimester emergency department visit (aOR,2.21; 95% CI, 1.24-3.94), higher odds of hospitalization during pregnancy (aOR,1.66; 95% CI, 1.01-2.73), and twice the mean number of third trimester emergency department visits and hospitalizations during pregnancy. Conclusions: Women with a history of multiple miscarriages may be more likely to smoke and may demonstrate increased health care utilization during a subsequent pregnancy. Compassionate, individualized, and supportive counseling by providers may address smoking and other health behaviors as well as increased health care utilization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)155-161
Number of pages7
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Health Behavior
Spontaneous Abortion
health behavior
pregnancy
utilization
health care
Pregnancy
history
Odds Ratio
Third Pregnancy Trimester
hospitalization
Smoke
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Prenatal Care
Health Resources
baby
Counseling
smoking

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery

Cite this

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title = "Effect of Multiple Previous Miscarriages on Health Behaviors and Health Care Utilization During Subsequent Pregnancy",
abstract = "Background: Women with a history of miscarriage report feeling emotionally guarded during a subsequent pregnancy and may be at increased risk for pregnancy-related anxiety and greater health care utilization compared with women without a history of miscarriage. However, these behaviors have not been studied in women with a history of multiple miscarriages. Methods: We examined the effect of a history of multiple miscarriages on health behaviors and health care utilization in 2,854 women ages 18 to 36years expecting their first live-born baby. Self-reported health behaviors and use of health care resources during pregnancy were compared for women with a history of two or more miscarriages and women with one or no miscarriages. Findings: Women with a history of multiple miscarriages were more than four times as likely to smoke during pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio [aOR],4.69; 95{\%} CI, 2.63-8.38) compared with women without a history of multiple miscarriages. They initiated prenatal care earlier (7.0 vs. 8.2weeks gestation), had higher odds of third trimester emergency department visit (aOR,2.21; 95{\%} CI, 1.24-3.94), higher odds of hospitalization during pregnancy (aOR,1.66; 95{\%} CI, 1.01-2.73), and twice the mean number of third trimester emergency department visits and hospitalizations during pregnancy. Conclusions: Women with a history of multiple miscarriages may be more likely to smoke and may demonstrate increased health care utilization during a subsequent pregnancy. Compassionate, individualized, and supportive counseling by providers may address smoking and other health behaviors as well as increased health care utilization.",
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Effect of Multiple Previous Miscarriages on Health Behaviors and Health Care Utilization During Subsequent Pregnancy. / Bicking Kinsey, Cara; Baptiste-Roberts, Kesha; Zhu, Junjia; Kjerulff, Kristen.

In: Women's Health Issues, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.01.2015, p. 155-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Background: Women with a history of miscarriage report feeling emotionally guarded during a subsequent pregnancy and may be at increased risk for pregnancy-related anxiety and greater health care utilization compared with women without a history of miscarriage. However, these behaviors have not been studied in women with a history of multiple miscarriages. Methods: We examined the effect of a history of multiple miscarriages on health behaviors and health care utilization in 2,854 women ages 18 to 36years expecting their first live-born baby. Self-reported health behaviors and use of health care resources during pregnancy were compared for women with a history of two or more miscarriages and women with one or no miscarriages. Findings: Women with a history of multiple miscarriages were more than four times as likely to smoke during pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio [aOR],4.69; 95% CI, 2.63-8.38) compared with women without a history of multiple miscarriages. They initiated prenatal care earlier (7.0 vs. 8.2weeks gestation), had higher odds of third trimester emergency department visit (aOR,2.21; 95% CI, 1.24-3.94), higher odds of hospitalization during pregnancy (aOR,1.66; 95% CI, 1.01-2.73), and twice the mean number of third trimester emergency department visits and hospitalizations during pregnancy. Conclusions: Women with a history of multiple miscarriages may be more likely to smoke and may demonstrate increased health care utilization during a subsequent pregnancy. Compassionate, individualized, and supportive counseling by providers may address smoking and other health behaviors as well as increased health care utilization.

AB - Background: Women with a history of miscarriage report feeling emotionally guarded during a subsequent pregnancy and may be at increased risk for pregnancy-related anxiety and greater health care utilization compared with women without a history of miscarriage. However, these behaviors have not been studied in women with a history of multiple miscarriages. Methods: We examined the effect of a history of multiple miscarriages on health behaviors and health care utilization in 2,854 women ages 18 to 36years expecting their first live-born baby. Self-reported health behaviors and use of health care resources during pregnancy were compared for women with a history of two or more miscarriages and women with one or no miscarriages. Findings: Women with a history of multiple miscarriages were more than four times as likely to smoke during pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio [aOR],4.69; 95% CI, 2.63-8.38) compared with women without a history of multiple miscarriages. They initiated prenatal care earlier (7.0 vs. 8.2weeks gestation), had higher odds of third trimester emergency department visit (aOR,2.21; 95% CI, 1.24-3.94), higher odds of hospitalization during pregnancy (aOR,1.66; 95% CI, 1.01-2.73), and twice the mean number of third trimester emergency department visits and hospitalizations during pregnancy. Conclusions: Women with a history of multiple miscarriages may be more likely to smoke and may demonstrate increased health care utilization during a subsequent pregnancy. Compassionate, individualized, and supportive counseling by providers may address smoking and other health behaviors as well as increased health care utilization.

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