Effect of Particle Size on High-Strain Rate Response of Sand

Sudheer Prabhu, Tong Qiu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Sand is extensively used in geotechnical engineering applications due to its abundance in the field. In general, sands are subjected to very low strain rates in most geotechnical engineering applications; however, during air or surface blasts, sands are subjected to high strain rates and their response needs to be studied in detail. The recent years have seen an increase in the usage of split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device to study the response of sand at very high stresses (on the order of MPa) and strain rates (10~1000/s). Researchers have shown that the particle size in sand influences its mechanical behavior at low strain rates. However, the effect of particle size on the stress-strain response of sand obtained from an SHPB device where particles are subjected to high strain rates is seldom studied. The particle size could also have an influence on the stress-equilibrium condition which needs to be satisfied by the specimen for the stress-strain analysis from the SHPB to be valid. However, the afore mentioned criteria are seldom studied and need to be studied in detail. In the current study, the SHPB device is modelled using a commercial software package LS-DYNA with a coupled finite elements-discrete element method. The sand specimens are modelled using polydisperse (spheres with varying sizes) and monodisperse discrete spheres. These simulations are used to understand the variation of stress-strain response of sand as a function of particle sizes. The study also provides insight into the effect of friction at the boundaries on the stress-strain response of the specimen. The results indicate that the specimen having larger polydisperse spheres provided similar stress-strain response as the specimen having smaller polydisperse spheres. However, the monodisperse specimen provided a softer response compared to the polydisperse specimens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationGeotechnical Special Publication
EditorsSanjeev Kumar, Miguel A. Pando, Christopher L. Meehan, Joseph T. Coe
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages155-164
Number of pages10
EditionGSP 310
ISBN (Electronic)9780784482070, 9780784482087, 9780784482094, 9780784482100, 9780784482117, 9780784482124, 9780784482131, 9780784482148, 9780784482155, 9780784482162
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Event8th International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering: Geotechnical Materials, Modeling, and Testing, Geo-Congress 2019 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Mar 24 2019Mar 27 2019

Publication series

NameGeotechnical Special Publication
NumberGSP 310
Volume2019-March
ISSN (Print)0895-0563

Conference

Conference8th International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering: Geotechnical Materials, Modeling, and Testing, Geo-Congress 2019
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period3/24/193/27/19

Fingerprint

strain rate
Strain rate
Sand
Particle size
particle size
sand
Geotechnical engineering
geotechnical engineering
strain analysis
discrete element method
effect
Finite difference method
Software packages
friction
Friction
software
air
Air
simulation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Architecture
  • Building and Construction
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Cite this

Prabhu, S., & Qiu, T. (2019). Effect of Particle Size on High-Strain Rate Response of Sand. In S. Kumar, M. A. Pando, C. L. Meehan, & J. T. Coe (Eds.), Geotechnical Special Publication (GSP 310 ed., pp. 155-164). (Geotechnical Special Publication; Vol. 2019-March, No. GSP 310). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784482124.017
Prabhu, Sudheer ; Qiu, Tong. / Effect of Particle Size on High-Strain Rate Response of Sand. Geotechnical Special Publication. editor / Sanjeev Kumar ; Miguel A. Pando ; Christopher L. Meehan ; Joseph T. Coe. GSP 310. ed. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2019. pp. 155-164 (Geotechnical Special Publication; GSP 310).
@inproceedings{645336f39c03431eb7c58a63d917c81b,
title = "Effect of Particle Size on High-Strain Rate Response of Sand",
abstract = "Sand is extensively used in geotechnical engineering applications due to its abundance in the field. In general, sands are subjected to very low strain rates in most geotechnical engineering applications; however, during air or surface blasts, sands are subjected to high strain rates and their response needs to be studied in detail. The recent years have seen an increase in the usage of split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device to study the response of sand at very high stresses (on the order of MPa) and strain rates (10~1000/s). Researchers have shown that the particle size in sand influences its mechanical behavior at low strain rates. However, the effect of particle size on the stress-strain response of sand obtained from an SHPB device where particles are subjected to high strain rates is seldom studied. The particle size could also have an influence on the stress-equilibrium condition which needs to be satisfied by the specimen for the stress-strain analysis from the SHPB to be valid. However, the afore mentioned criteria are seldom studied and need to be studied in detail. In the current study, the SHPB device is modelled using a commercial software package LS-DYNA with a coupled finite elements-discrete element method. The sand specimens are modelled using polydisperse (spheres with varying sizes) and monodisperse discrete spheres. These simulations are used to understand the variation of stress-strain response of sand as a function of particle sizes. The study also provides insight into the effect of friction at the boundaries on the stress-strain response of the specimen. The results indicate that the specimen having larger polydisperse spheres provided similar stress-strain response as the specimen having smaller polydisperse spheres. However, the monodisperse specimen provided a softer response compared to the polydisperse specimens.",
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Prabhu, S & Qiu, T 2019, Effect of Particle Size on High-Strain Rate Response of Sand. in S Kumar, MA Pando, CL Meehan & JT Coe (eds), Geotechnical Special Publication. GSP 310 edn, Geotechnical Special Publication, no. GSP 310, vol. 2019-March, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 155-164, 8th International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering: Geotechnical Materials, Modeling, and Testing, Geo-Congress 2019, Philadelphia, United States, 3/24/19. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784482124.017

Effect of Particle Size on High-Strain Rate Response of Sand. / Prabhu, Sudheer; Qiu, Tong.

Geotechnical Special Publication. ed. / Sanjeev Kumar; Miguel A. Pando; Christopher L. Meehan; Joseph T. Coe. GSP 310. ed. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2019. p. 155-164 (Geotechnical Special Publication; Vol. 2019-March, No. GSP 310).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AU - Qiu, Tong

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N2 - Sand is extensively used in geotechnical engineering applications due to its abundance in the field. In general, sands are subjected to very low strain rates in most geotechnical engineering applications; however, during air or surface blasts, sands are subjected to high strain rates and their response needs to be studied in detail. The recent years have seen an increase in the usage of split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device to study the response of sand at very high stresses (on the order of MPa) and strain rates (10~1000/s). Researchers have shown that the particle size in sand influences its mechanical behavior at low strain rates. However, the effect of particle size on the stress-strain response of sand obtained from an SHPB device where particles are subjected to high strain rates is seldom studied. The particle size could also have an influence on the stress-equilibrium condition which needs to be satisfied by the specimen for the stress-strain analysis from the SHPB to be valid. However, the afore mentioned criteria are seldom studied and need to be studied in detail. In the current study, the SHPB device is modelled using a commercial software package LS-DYNA with a coupled finite elements-discrete element method. The sand specimens are modelled using polydisperse (spheres with varying sizes) and monodisperse discrete spheres. These simulations are used to understand the variation of stress-strain response of sand as a function of particle sizes. The study also provides insight into the effect of friction at the boundaries on the stress-strain response of the specimen. The results indicate that the specimen having larger polydisperse spheres provided similar stress-strain response as the specimen having smaller polydisperse spheres. However, the monodisperse specimen provided a softer response compared to the polydisperse specimens.

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Prabhu S, Qiu T. Effect of Particle Size on High-Strain Rate Response of Sand. In Kumar S, Pando MA, Meehan CL, Coe JT, editors, Geotechnical Special Publication. GSP 310 ed. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2019. p. 155-164. (Geotechnical Special Publication; GSP 310). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784482124.017