Effect of reducing the phytate content of infant cereals by using endogenous phytase on zinc and iron absorption in rat pups

S. L. Kelleher, L. Christensen, H. Ahlmén, C. Tennefors, L. B. Sjöberg, B. Lönnerdal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Cereal is one of the most common weaning foods in both industrialized and less developed countries. Unfortunately, cereals contain relatively high concentrations of phytic acid, which is known to have an inhibitory effect on Zn and Fe absorption. Attempts have been made to reduce the phytate content by industrial processes, including precipitation methods, treatment with added phytase and fermentation. In this study, we optimized the process conditions for allowing endogenous phytase to reduce the phytate concentration of infant cereals, and evaluated the effects in a suckling rat pup model. Cereals and gruels (cereal+milk) with native and reduced phytate levels, milk formula and breast milk were studied. Diets were labelled with 65Zn or 59Fe and intubated to fasted pups(n=8/group). Pups were killed 4 h post-intubation, organs dissected and counted in a gamma counter. Zn absorption from untreated cereals varied between 42-68%. Reducing the phytate content increased Zn absorption from 47 to 75% for cereals (with fruit), from 63 to 86% for gruel and from 68 to 85% for cereal/milk as compared to milk formula (93%) and breast milk (95%). Fe absorption from untreated cereals was higher than Zn absorption and the effects of reducing phytate were less pronounced, although it increased from 70 to 90% for cereals. The results show that endogenous phytase can have positive effects on Zn and Fe absorption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume12
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 20 1998

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6-Phytase
Phytic Acid
Zinc
Rats
Iron
Milk
Human Milk
Nutrition
Fruits
Fermentation
Edible Grain
Weaning
Intubation
Developing Countries
Fruit

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Kelleher, S. L., Christensen, L., Ahlmén, H., Tennefors, C., Sjöberg, L. B., & Lönnerdal, B. (1998). Effect of reducing the phytate content of infant cereals by using endogenous phytase on zinc and iron absorption in rat pups. FASEB Journal, 12(5).
Kelleher, S. L. ; Christensen, L. ; Ahlmén, H. ; Tennefors, C. ; Sjöberg, L. B. ; Lönnerdal, B. / Effect of reducing the phytate content of infant cereals by using endogenous phytase on zinc and iron absorption in rat pups. In: FASEB Journal. 1998 ; Vol. 12, No. 5.
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Kelleher, SL, Christensen, L, Ahlmén, H, Tennefors, C, Sjöberg, LB & Lönnerdal, B 1998, 'Effect of reducing the phytate content of infant cereals by using endogenous phytase on zinc and iron absorption in rat pups', FASEB Journal, vol. 12, no. 5.

Effect of reducing the phytate content of infant cereals by using endogenous phytase on zinc and iron absorption in rat pups. / Kelleher, S. L.; Christensen, L.; Ahlmén, H.; Tennefors, C.; Sjöberg, L. B.; Lönnerdal, B.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 12, No. 5, 20.03.1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kelleher, S. L.

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AU - Sjöberg, L. B.

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Kelleher SL, Christensen L, Ahlmén H, Tennefors C, Sjöberg LB, Lönnerdal B. Effect of reducing the phytate content of infant cereals by using endogenous phytase on zinc and iron absorption in rat pups. FASEB Journal. 1998 Mar 20;12(5).