Effect of the diastolic and systolic duration on valve cavitation in a pediatric pulsatile ventricular assist device

Branka Lukic, Conrad M. Zapanta, Kimberly A. Griffith, William Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Minimization of cavitation is of high importance in the design of pulsatile ventricular assist devices because cavitation can cause blood and valve surface damage. Cavitation is associated with valve closure and has been previously correlated to high dP/dt, high valve closing velocity, and decreased pump filling. In this study, the effects of diastolic and systolic duration on the inlet and outlet valve cavitation were investigated. A low volume (280 ml) mock circulatory loop filled with room-temperature saline was used. A high-fidelity hydrophone was mounted into the inlet valve connector approximately 0.5 cm upstream from the inlet valve to quantify inlet valve cavitation. The inlet valve connector and hydrophone were placed symmetrically on the outlet side when measuring outlet valve cavitation. The RMS intensity of a 6-millisecond window pressure trace, bandpass filtered from 50 to 500 kHz, was used to quantify cavitation intensity. Approximately 80 beats were recorded at every test condition. High-speed video and an accelerometer were used to determine the position of the valves during closure. The cavitation intensity of the inlet valve was minimal when the onset of systole occurred at the moment when the pump just completed filling (RMS was approximately zero). The cavitation intensity increased when the onset of systole occurred before the pump was completely filled (valve partially opened), reaching a plateau of approximately 16 mm Hg when the valve was fully open. The cavitation intensity increased again when diastolic duration exceeded pump filling time by more than 30 milliseconds. The outlet valve cavitation intensity was very low (<4 mm Hg) regardless of the systolic duration, which can be attributed to the position of the hydrophone being on the opposite side of cavitation events. Although very small, the outlet cavitation intensities with respect to systolic duration show a trend similar to the inlet valve cavitation with respect to diastolic duration. Both inlet and outlet valve cavitation increased with increased peak regurgitant flow. An understanding of the relationship of the inlet and outlet valve cavitation to the diastolic and systolic duration can be used to determine the optimal operating conditions of the pulsatile pediatric pump.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)546-550
Number of pages5
JournalASAIO Journal
Volume51
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

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