Effect of the venodilated state on sympathetic-induced venoconstriction in normal subjects

Andrew Sumner, Robert Zelis, Mark Bennett, Joseph A. Gascho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The interaction between venoconstriction induced by application of ice to the forehead and nitroglycerin-induced venodilation was examined in 19 healthy male volunteers, ages 25 ± 5 years (mean ± standard deviation). Venous tone was determined by the equilibration technique. Mercury-in-silastic plethysmography was used to measure changes in forearm volume before and after ice application during control conditions, and before and after ice application in the venodilated state (nitroglycerin spray, 0.8 mg). Venous tone and arterial pressure increased significantly after the application of ice to the forehead in both the control and venodilated states, indicating that ice increased sympathetic tone. Nitroglycerin increased venous volume by 0.28 cc/100 cc arm. The venoconstrictive effect of ice after nitroglycerin (a decrease in venous volume of 0.53 cc/100 cc arm) was quantitatively similar to the venoconstrictive effect of ice during control conditions (a decrease in venous volume of 0.54 cc/ 100 cc arm). These results suggest that sympathetic-induced venoconstriction is not attenuated in the venodilated state.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)973-976
Number of pages4
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume63
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 1989

Fingerprint

Ice
Nitroglycerin
Arm
Forehead
Venous Pressure
Plethysmography
Mercury
Forearm
Healthy Volunteers
Arterial Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{781d8dbd5507462d881c86a40dcfc9b2,
title = "Effect of the venodilated state on sympathetic-induced venoconstriction in normal subjects",
abstract = "The interaction between venoconstriction induced by application of ice to the forehead and nitroglycerin-induced venodilation was examined in 19 healthy male volunteers, ages 25 ± 5 years (mean ± standard deviation). Venous tone was determined by the equilibration technique. Mercury-in-silastic plethysmography was used to measure changes in forearm volume before and after ice application during control conditions, and before and after ice application in the venodilated state (nitroglycerin spray, 0.8 mg). Venous tone and arterial pressure increased significantly after the application of ice to the forehead in both the control and venodilated states, indicating that ice increased sympathetic tone. Nitroglycerin increased venous volume by 0.28 cc/100 cc arm. The venoconstrictive effect of ice after nitroglycerin (a decrease in venous volume of 0.53 cc/100 cc arm) was quantitatively similar to the venoconstrictive effect of ice during control conditions (a decrease in venous volume of 0.54 cc/ 100 cc arm). These results suggest that sympathetic-induced venoconstriction is not attenuated in the venodilated state.",
author = "Andrew Sumner and Robert Zelis and Mark Bennett and Gascho, {Joseph A.}",
year = "1989",
month = "4",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/0002-9149(89)90151-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "973--976",
journal = "American Journal of Cardiology",
issn = "0002-9149",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "13",

}

Effect of the venodilated state on sympathetic-induced venoconstriction in normal subjects. / Sumner, Andrew; Zelis, Robert; Bennett, Mark; Gascho, Joseph A.

In: The American journal of cardiology, Vol. 63, No. 13, 15.04.1989, p. 973-976.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of the venodilated state on sympathetic-induced venoconstriction in normal subjects

AU - Sumner, Andrew

AU - Zelis, Robert

AU - Bennett, Mark

AU - Gascho, Joseph A.

PY - 1989/4/15

Y1 - 1989/4/15

N2 - The interaction between venoconstriction induced by application of ice to the forehead and nitroglycerin-induced venodilation was examined in 19 healthy male volunteers, ages 25 ± 5 years (mean ± standard deviation). Venous tone was determined by the equilibration technique. Mercury-in-silastic plethysmography was used to measure changes in forearm volume before and after ice application during control conditions, and before and after ice application in the venodilated state (nitroglycerin spray, 0.8 mg). Venous tone and arterial pressure increased significantly after the application of ice to the forehead in both the control and venodilated states, indicating that ice increased sympathetic tone. Nitroglycerin increased venous volume by 0.28 cc/100 cc arm. The venoconstrictive effect of ice after nitroglycerin (a decrease in venous volume of 0.53 cc/100 cc arm) was quantitatively similar to the venoconstrictive effect of ice during control conditions (a decrease in venous volume of 0.54 cc/ 100 cc arm). These results suggest that sympathetic-induced venoconstriction is not attenuated in the venodilated state.

AB - The interaction between venoconstriction induced by application of ice to the forehead and nitroglycerin-induced venodilation was examined in 19 healthy male volunteers, ages 25 ± 5 years (mean ± standard deviation). Venous tone was determined by the equilibration technique. Mercury-in-silastic plethysmography was used to measure changes in forearm volume before and after ice application during control conditions, and before and after ice application in the venodilated state (nitroglycerin spray, 0.8 mg). Venous tone and arterial pressure increased significantly after the application of ice to the forehead in both the control and venodilated states, indicating that ice increased sympathetic tone. Nitroglycerin increased venous volume by 0.28 cc/100 cc arm. The venoconstrictive effect of ice after nitroglycerin (a decrease in venous volume of 0.53 cc/100 cc arm) was quantitatively similar to the venoconstrictive effect of ice during control conditions (a decrease in venous volume of 0.54 cc/ 100 cc arm). These results suggest that sympathetic-induced venoconstriction is not attenuated in the venodilated state.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024556274&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024556274&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0002-9149(89)90151-3

DO - 10.1016/0002-9149(89)90151-3

M3 - Article

C2 - 2494876

AN - SCOPUS:0024556274

VL - 63

SP - 973

EP - 976

JO - American Journal of Cardiology

JF - American Journal of Cardiology

SN - 0002-9149

IS - 13

ER -