Effectiveness and acceptance of adaptive intelligent speed adaptation systems

Stephen Arhin, Azim Eskandarian, Jeremy Blum, Pierre Delaigue, Damoon Soudbakhsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) systems face significant consumer acceptance hurdles that limit the likelihood of widespread adoption, particularly in the United States. However, if these systems are designed as speed management systems rather than speed limiting systems, with adaptability to individual driving behavior, they may be more likely to meet with consumer acceptance. The results of a fixed-based driving simulator experiment that tested the acceptance and effectiveness of a new type of ISA, called an Advanced Vehicular Speed Adaptation System (AVSAS), are reported. The results of the experiment showed that AVSAS resulted in reductions in driver speeds across a range of roadway types. AVSAS is a speed management system that adapts to an individual driver's speed behavior and the current driving situation. AVSAS resulted in an average reduction of 5% of the maximum speeds and 3% of the average speeds of the drivers on four road segments. As expected, AVSAS did not reduce driver speeds as much as the mandatory control ISA system, and the experiment confirmed the results of tests conducted on ISA systems largely in Europe. Conversely, the results revealed that more participants were willing to purchase AVSAS compared with the information or mandatory ISAs. Although these results show the promise of a trade-off between system effectiveness and acceptability that has been missing in mandatory and information ISA research, AVSAS suggests that a range of ISA system design requirements could encourage the adoption of ISA systems in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-139
Number of pages7
JournalTransportation Research Record
Issue number2086
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

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Experiments
Intelligent control
Simulators
Systems analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Arhin, Stephen ; Eskandarian, Azim ; Blum, Jeremy ; Delaigue, Pierre ; Soudbakhsh, Damoon. / Effectiveness and acceptance of adaptive intelligent speed adaptation systems. In: Transportation Research Record. 2008 ; No. 2086. pp. 133-139.
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Effectiveness and acceptance of adaptive intelligent speed adaptation systems. / Arhin, Stephen; Eskandarian, Azim; Blum, Jeremy; Delaigue, Pierre; Soudbakhsh, Damoon.

In: Transportation Research Record, No. 2086, 01.12.2008, p. 133-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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