Effects of change in arthritis severity on spouse well-being: The moderating role of relationship closeness

Courtney A. Polenick, Lynn Margaret Martire, Rachel C. Hemphill, Mary Ann Parris Stephens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The severity of a patient's illness may be detrimental for the psychological well-being of the spouse, especially for those in a particularly close relationship. Using 2 waves of data collected from a sample of 152 knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients and their spouses, we examined associations between change in patients' illness severity and change in 3 indicators of spouses' well-being (positive affect, depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction) over a 6-month period. We also tested the hypothesis that spouses' perceived relationship closeness with the patient would moderate these associations. Consistent with our prediction, a high level of relationship closeness exacerbated the negative impact of increases in patient illness severity on spouses' positive affect and depressive symptoms over 6 months. Spouses' life satisfaction declined when patients became more ill, regardless of level of relationship closeness. Our findings highlight the value of examining change in illness as a predictor of change in spouse well-being and the potential downside of relationship closeness for couples living with chronic illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-338
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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Spouses
Arthritis
Depression
Knee Osteoarthritis
Chronic Disease
Psychology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Polenick, Courtney A. ; Martire, Lynn Margaret ; Hemphill, Rachel C. ; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris. / Effects of change in arthritis severity on spouse well-being : The moderating role of relationship closeness. In: Journal of Family Psychology. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 331-338.
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Effects of change in arthritis severity on spouse well-being : The moderating role of relationship closeness. / Polenick, Courtney A.; Martire, Lynn Margaret; Hemphill, Rachel C.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.06.2015, p. 331-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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