Effects of demographic and socioeconomic variables on preventive health care decisions: An empirical investigation of cervical and breast cancer screening decisions

Ali Kara, Chidem Kurdas, Michael DeStefano, Richard R. Bacha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Demographic and cognitive variables have often been found to be significant determinants of symptomatically driven health screenings. However, their role in preventive health care decisions is less clear. Using National Health Interview Survey data, we have examined the factors that are correlated to cervical and breast cancer screenings. The results of logistic regression analysis suggest that significant determinants of the decision to have a Papanicolaou smear include type of health insurance, formal education, income level, age, race, marital status and health knowledge. The significant variables for the mammogram decision are different in kind or degree from that of Papanicolaou smear. Our findings indicate that having additional type of health insurance, region of residency and self-reported health status are among the most significant determinants for breast cancer screening decisions. We offer theoretical explanations for the different results, as well as further research suggestions. Managerial and policy implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-54
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Medical Marketing
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics (miscellaneous)
  • Strategy and Management
  • Marketing

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