Effects of diet and obesity on body weight regulation during pregnancy and lactation in the rat

Barbara J. Rolls, P. M. van Duijvenvoorde, Edward A. Rowe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of obesity level and cafeteria feeding were studied in rats during pregnancy and lactation. The non-fetal weight gain in pregnancy was three times greater with the cafeteria diet than with chow, indicating that fat deposition is not regulated at an optimal level during pregnancy. There was a strong negative correlation between postpartum weight and weight change during lactation. Obese rats were finicky in that their weight changes in lactation were exaggerated when the diet was changed between pregnancy and lactation. Pup growth rate was proportional to maternal energy intake but in this experiment not related to maternal protein, fat or carbohydrate intake. In obese rats switched to chow, intake was inadequate for normal pup growth. Thus, the weight gains in pregnancy are not regulated at a set level, and the weight change in lactation appears to compensate for the weight gain in pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-168
Number of pages8
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1984

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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