Effects of diltiazem on cardiac function and regional blood flow at rest and during exercise in a conscious rat preparation of chronic heart failure (myocardial infarction)

H. Drexler, J. W. Depenbusch, A. G. Truog, R. Zelis, S. F. Flaim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of intravenous infusion of diltiazem on regional blood flow (radioactive microspheres), hemodynamics, and maximum rate of oxygen consumption were evaluated in conscious rats with congestive heart failure caused by large myocardial infarction (n = 10, infarct size 41.8% of left ventricle) and compared with data obtained from rats subjected to sham surgical procedures (n = 9). In both groups data were obtained at rest and during submaximal treadmill exercise during alternate infusion of diltiazem and saline. In the group with heart failure, diltiazem increased stroke volume at rest and during exercise (p < .05), reduced heart rate (p < .05), and improved cardiac output during exercise (p < .05) without increasing left ventricular end-diastolic pressure in any of the animals. Blood flow to renal and splanchnic circulations was reduced in the group with heart failure but was increased by diltiazem to values similar to those observed in sham-operated animals. Although skeletal muscle flow during exercise was significantly increased by the drug, maximal rate of oxygen consumption was not, indicating unchanged oxygen availability within working muscle. Thus diltiazem caused redistribution of blood flow to kidney and gut in animals with myocardial infarction and failure, thereby restoring blood flow to circulatory beds known to be impaired in this setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1262-1270
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation
Volume71
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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