Effects of direct and averted gaze on the perception of facially communicated emotion

Reginald B. Adams, Robert E. Kleck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

328 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research has largely neglected the effects of gaze direction cues on the perception of facial expressions of emotion. It was hypothesized that when gaze direction matches the underlying behavioral intent (approach-avoidance) communicated by an emotional expression, the perception of that emotion would be enhanced (i.e., shared signal hypothesis). Specifically, the authors expected that (a) direct gaze would enhance the perception of approach-oriented emotions (anger and joy) and (b) averted eye gaze would enhance the perception of avoidance-oriented emotions (fear and sadness). Three studies supported this hypothesis. Study 1 examined emotional trait attributions made to neutral faces. Study 2 examined ratings of ambiguous facial blends of anger and fear. Study 3 examined the influence of gaze on the perception of highly prototypical expressions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-11
Number of pages9
JournalEmotion
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

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Emotions
Anger
Fear
Facial Expression
Cues
Research
Direction compound

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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Effects of direct and averted gaze on the perception of facially communicated emotion. / Adams, Reginald B.; Kleck, Robert E.

In: Emotion, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.03.2005, p. 3-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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