Effects of ear type and weather on the hospital prevalence of canine otitis externa.

H. M. Hayes, Linda Williams Pickle, G. P. Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A retrospective study of 8975 dogs seen at 15 university veterinary medical teaching hospitals in North America (1975 to 1978) found that dogs with pendulous ears and heavy ear canal hair had significantly (P less than 0.01) more otitis externa than dogs with other ear types. Dogs with erect ears, regardless of the amount of ear canal hair, had less risk (P less than 0.01) of the disease than mongrel dogs. Direct evidence is available for the first time showing that monthly variations in ambient temperature, rainfall and relative humidity explain, to a large extent, the monthly variations in the hospital prevalence of canine otitis externa in different geographic regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-298
Number of pages5
JournalResearch in Veterinary Science
Volume42
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 1 1987

Fingerprint

Otitis Externa
otitis externa
Weather
Ear
Canidae
ears
weather
Dogs
Ear Canal
dogs
Hair
Dog Diseases
hairs
North America
Humidity
Teaching Hospitals
Retrospective Studies
retrospective studies
Temperature
ambient temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Hayes, H. M. ; Pickle, Linda Williams ; Wilson, G. P. / Effects of ear type and weather on the hospital prevalence of canine otitis externa. In: Research in Veterinary Science. 1987 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 294-298.
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Effects of ear type and weather on the hospital prevalence of canine otitis externa. / Hayes, H. M.; Pickle, Linda Williams; Wilson, G. P.

In: Research in Veterinary Science, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.05.1987, p. 294-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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