Effects of fat and fiber on human colon cancer xenografted to athymic nude mice

Thomas McGarrity, Laurie P. Peiffer, Scott T. Kramer, Jill P. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of unsaturated fat and fiber (cellulose) on the growth of human colon cancer explanted to athymic nude mice was evaluated. Eighty-seven male nude mice bearing xenografts of human HT29 or WiDr colon cancer were divided into three groups of equal weight and tumor volume. Each group was fed one of three diets: normal fat/no fiber (N/N), high fat/no fiber (H/N) or high fat/high fiber (H/H). To equalize caloric intake, animals in the H/N group received 4 g of food per day and the other animals were fed 5 g of food per day. At sacrifice tumor volume and weight was recorded, and tumors were analyzed for protein and DNA content and ornithine decarboxylase activity. Tumor volume, weight, and protein were greater in the H/N group compared to the N/N group for both colon cancer cell lines. Tumor DNA content was greater in the HT29 H/N group compared to the N/N group (P<0.05) and tumor ornithine decarboxylase activity in the WiDr H/N group was greater than the N/N animals (P<0.002). The tumor growth-promoting effects of the high unsaturated fat diet were attenuated by the addition of fiber. Animal weight was higher in the H/N group compared to the N/N and H/H groups. This study suggested that a high-fat diet stimulated and fiber decreased the growth of human colon cancer explanted to athymic nude mice. The growth-promoting effects of a high-fat diet in colorectal cancer may be due in part to a circulating trophic factor since these tumors were remote from the large intestine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1606-1610
Number of pages5
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1991

Fingerprint

Nude Mice
Colonic Neoplasms
Fats
Tumor Burden
High Fat Diet
Unsaturated Fats
Ornithine Decarboxylase
Neoplasms
Growth
Weights and Measures
Food
Large Intestine
DNA
Energy Intake
Heterografts
Cellulose
Colorectal Neoplasms
Proteins
Diet
Cell Line

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

McGarrity, Thomas ; Peiffer, Laurie P. ; Kramer, Scott T. ; Smith, Jill P. / Effects of fat and fiber on human colon cancer xenografted to athymic nude mice. In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 1991 ; Vol. 36, No. 11. pp. 1606-1610.
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Effects of fat and fiber on human colon cancer xenografted to athymic nude mice. / McGarrity, Thomas; Peiffer, Laurie P.; Kramer, Scott T.; Smith, Jill P.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 36, No. 11, 01.11.1991, p. 1606-1610.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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