Effects of forest fragmentation on behaviour patterns in the eastern chipmunk (Tamias striatus)

Carolyn G. Mahan, R. H. Yahner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined behaviour in adult eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus) from 1992 to 1995 in a landscape altered by forest clear-cutting in central Pennsylvania, U.S.A. Our objective was to compare behaviour patterns in chipmunk populations occupying mature continuous forest versus mature forested corridors (100 m wide) surrounded by clearcuts Chipmunks spent a significantly greater proportion of their time pausing in the forested-corridor habitat than in the continuous-forest habitat. In addition, chipmunks spent less time locomoting and foraging in the forested-corridor habitat than in the continuous forest. We attributed differences in behaviour patterns between chipmunks in the two forest types primarily to the influence of forest fragmentation on the risk of predation and to the availability of food resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1991-1997
Number of pages7
JournalCanadian journal of zoology
Volume77
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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